Date   

Re: Rear Wheel Speed Sensor Failure Investigation

Keith Taylor
 

I got mine...but I have already had to change both of mine..

So now I called MB dealership and wrote letter trying to get reimbursed .

KT

On Sat, Feb 27, 2021, 7:21 PM Jerry Knowles <knowlesjv087@...> wrote:
I see that the notice was sent to consumers on FEB 22.  Haven’t received mine.  Want to take mine to Mercedes here in Tucson before heading home to the Seattle area.
Jerry K
18J


On Feb 27, 2021, at 2:44 PM, Jimbo 2016 VG Victor,NY via groups.io <rvjimbo=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

 I did not either.

rvjimbo 16VG


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Saturday, February 27, 2021, 12:44 AM, stenor via groups.io <stenor=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Did anyone get their recall notice this week? I did not.

Steve N
2019 24G
previously 2006 23H



Sent from my Galaxy


Re: Rear Wheel Speed Sensor Failure Investigation

Michael Powers
 

I received my recall notice but when I contacted my service center they hadn’t been notified of the recall on my unit yet. They won’t do anything with the recall until MB notifies them or updates it in their computer system.

Mike 17 NV

On Feb 27, 2021, at 5:21 PM, Jerry Knowles <knowlesjv087@...> wrote:

I see that the notice was sent to consumers on FEB 22.  Haven’t received mine.  Want to take mine to Mercedes here in Tucson before heading home to the Seattle area.
Jerry K
18J


On Feb 27, 2021, at 2:44 PM, Jimbo 2016 VG Victor,NY via groups.io <rvjimbo@...> wrote:

 I did not either.

rvjimbo 16VG


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Saturday, February 27, 2021, 12:44 AM, stenor via groups.io <stenor@...> wrote:

Did anyone get their recall notice this week? I did not.

Steve N
2019 24G
previously 2006 23H



Sent from my Galaxy


Re: Rear Wheel Speed Sensor Failure Investigation

Jerry Knowles
 

I see that the notice was sent to consumers on FEB 22.  Haven’t received mine.  Want to take mine to Mercedes here in Tucson before heading home to the Seattle area.
Jerry K
18J


On Feb 27, 2021, at 2:44 PM, Jimbo 2016 VG Victor,NY via groups.io <rvjimbo@...> wrote:

 I did not either.

rvjimbo 16VG


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Saturday, February 27, 2021, 12:44 AM, stenor via groups.io <stenor@...> wrote:

Did anyone get their recall notice this week? I did not.

Steve N
2019 24G
previously 2006 23H



Sent from my Galaxy


Re: Texas Freeze

Ron
 

Each area blends their winter diesel to not gel at the expected lowest temps. I guess that was way below expected.

Ron 16J


Re: Rear Wheel Speed Sensor Failure Investigation

Jimbo 2016 VG Victor,NY
 

I did not either.

On Saturday, February 27, 2021, 12:44 AM, stenor via groups.io <stenor@...> wrote:

Did anyone get their recall notice this week? I did not.

Steve N
2019 24G
previously 2006 23H



Sent from my Galaxy


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Jake
 

The others here have given you good advice and called out the known weak points on these units.   Also it's important to separate the Sprinter vs. the house part of the rig.  Sounds like you're concerned about the Sprinter part.  I recommend joining the sprinter forums (https://sprinter-source.com) and focus on the T1N models' chatter there.  I have learned so much.  

My 07H (on an 06 chassis) has been generally reliable.  I bought it April 2018 at 38k miles and today, almost 3 years later, it't at 87k miles, meaning I've put 39K on it in the last 3 years.  The first year (10k) not towing, then towing a 2000 lb Samurai.  I'm full time and oscillate between driving a lot and staying still a lot (but even if I'm working a 6-month gig, I still pack it up and drive it every 2-4 weeks to exercise it, fill propane, etc.)  Very reliable.  

I've blown a few turbo resonators and replaced with the aluminum turbo resonator eliminator.  The turbo hoses do blow and leave you stranded; I carry spares and change them as needed, others change them at 30k.  Only unexpected break I had was, I just now changed my in-tank low-pressure fuel pump, as it was becoming noisy and eventually putting me in limp mode with P0087 Low Rail Pressure codes.  I do have a random electrical issue somewhere between the door switch, dash board, and dome light, where sometimes those things just come on at night for no reason--I need to chase down bad ground somewhere, but it hasn't become a priority to me in the 3 years it's been doing it.

I keep a spare fuel filter onboard in case of a water event.  A shop found a percentage of water in my brake fluid and changed it out (the "exceptional bleed" process), ironically right after I had it changed during a B service.  I have since chosen not to care and just don't drive downhill anymore, only uphill.  I changed my transmission fluid (including torque converter) at 60k and 85k, and will probably do it again tomorrow just for fun.  I occasionally look for Black Death signs around the injectors.  I'm not an experienced mechanic, but I have a brain and I've managed to do most of my own service on my vehicles when possible--reading books and forums, googling things, and watching YouTube videos brings me up to speed on various issues and arms me to fix things myself or talk intelligently with a shop.

I expect the transmission to die someday since they all do, so I keep an extra $5,000 in the bank for that and when it happens I will probably order a replacement SilverStar transmission (supposedly rebuilt to overcome the weak points) or have mine rebuilt, depending on my trust with whatever shop I die near.  When I get scared about a new noise, I consult Doktor A in SC, a famous Sprinter mechanic.  I also paid him for a full day of routine service and inspections, with him letting me participate at every step, and with him talking about everything I need to know.  (For example, did you know that idler pulleys are not supposed to spin forever in your hand? That means they're dry and about to die.  If their bearings are properly lubed, there should be some resistance!)

I would trust this thing to take me to Alaska and back many more times.  It is way more reliable than the newer units with their DEF troubles and wheel speed sensor issues.  Every time I think about upgrading to another unit, I think how I just wouldn't trust anything else as much as I trust this rig.

Soooooooo......   I would say fix what needs to be fixed, keep an eye out for known common problems and be prepared to deal with them, but know that in general you likely have a reliable vehicle that just needs a few things addressed before you can feel like you can trust it completely.  This forum, the FB group, and the Sprinter forums are full of great people that are always ready to help.

Jake


--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop


Hellwig Swaybar

LED
 

Just a heads up for anyone who has installed a Hellwig (#7254) rear swaybar.  I installed mine on our 2010 Navion about 20k miles back. The other day while doing inspections underneath I noticed one of the brackets had fatigued and broken.  I emailed Hellwig and they were quick to respond.  They say they no longer ship the sway bar with brackets and instead reuse the OEM brackets. Unfortunately I discarded mine recently in a cleanup. They are sending me replacements and the new bushing in case I find another OEM set.  So if you still have your OEM brackets and bolts hang on to them for replacements. 


Larry
Nav 24k 2010 NJ


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Glenn Franco
 

Thanks for the information on the ABS problem.
The question I have is did the ABS lamp come on yellow or red and did it set a code?
limited top speed has been a real issue on this other sprinter. Now it's an intermittent problem but it has not set an ABS code.
Glenn


On Sat, Feb 27, 2021 at 7:01 AM bike_for_life2003 <guzowskip@...> wrote:

Glenn,

Congratulations on your 06H ... we love ours which we bought three years ago with 76K miles on the clock and had a bumper-to-bumper check by the M-B dealer including new brakes and transmission service in conjunction with the 80K service.  I won't bore you or others here will all the fixes/mods we have made since then... Send me a PM if you want a more detailed description.  

Regarding intermittent issues, they are indeed vexing.  When I flew jets in the Air Force, one of the things I hated to see in the aircraft forms before flight was a write-up for a problem and the maintenance folks had signed it off with the dreaded "CND" (could not duplicate)...  

As for not being able to go over 55 mph, we had a similar problem during a trip to two funerals last October.   It turned out to be a failing ABS controller but we didn't know it at the time.   There was a lot of wind and I thought our ability to get over 60 mph was related to that.... In retrospect it wasn't.  About 15 miles from our planned first night's stop the CEL illuminated with no performance degradation or other indications... INITIALLY.   Before I could to a rest area or off ramp to investigate one by one all lights on the dash related to brakes, etc. illuminated... what we pilots call "Christmas Tree"....  First job.. maintain vehicle control... Second, analyze the situation and take corrective action... Third, land as soon as conditions permit.  Another catch-phrase in the aviation world is "Aviate, Navigate, Communicate"...  

I drove carefully into the campground outside Montgomery, AL and immediately got on the internet to see what might be the problem.  I was hoping maybe a fuse had blown or a circuit breaker had popped.  No luck.  Next morning I called one company which advertised they serviced Sprinter fleets but they didn't answer promptly and then said they couldn't help.  Then called Jack Ingram M-B in Montgomery and huge kudos to them for working us into their maintenance schedule.  Huge shout out to them for helping us in our time of need.

The View started and ran normally at idle and moving out of the campground but it would not shift above 2nd gear.  I drove 13 miles to the dealer at 40 mph and high RPM...  not fun on the interstate but I wasn't familiar with the area so had to follow the GPS steering.

Turned out the ABS controller had apparently failed (electronically) because the dealer's cosmic analysis tools showed no communication between the ABS controller and the ECU (engine control unit).  Turns out that without wheel speed inputs through the ABS controller, the transmission control unit (TCU) and ECU revert to survival mode.  

We needed a new ABS controller and the dealer did not have one on hand but found one at the M-B depot in Jacksonville which they ordered for overnight delivery.  We spent an unexpected night in a hotel but next morning the new controller was installed, brakes were bled, and we were on our way.  

This was the only major issue we have had in 25K miles with this View or 25K with our previous RV, 99 Rialta.  We have a very comprehensive roadside assistance program so rest easy that we would be well cared for if we broke down... though that hasn't happened yet.

As an aside, I did find out that the failed ABS controller can be rebuilt for much less than we paid for the new one.  I may choose to do that to have a spare but am leaning toward donating it to a tech who does lots of work and may be able to save a customer some big bucks.  

I'm not a huge fan of preemptive transmission replacement but we are doing a complete motor front-end overhaul (new Bosch alternator, hoses, water pump, turbo resonator, pulleys, serpentine belt, etc) plus transmission/torque converter and differential service in the next couple of weeks.  We just hit 100K miles so this should reset the clock for the next 100K, eh?

Bottom Line:  We have had superb service from our 06 View (don't tow or travel overweight) and expect it to give us many more happy miles down the road. Keeping to the M-B schedule for maintenance rather than waiting till something is broken to fix it is key.... The military and all fleet owners know this very well... 
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Glenn Franco
 

Thanks Dennis
I'm over in the villages, FL

I agree with your thoughts on the unit being stored.
Glenn


On Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 7:56 PM Denis Druker <denisdruker@...> wrote:
I bought a 2008 model H with 18000 miles 7 years ago.  We spend the winters in Florida in it.  Drive it on a fall trip to the southeast.  Have crossed the Rockys three times. Over 80000 miles now as I write this message from Inverness FL.   The converter is the only item that has failed. My theory is that if these things are not used they will give you especially electrical problems.  -- same as a boat or a car.  If you buy one with extensive storage time - beware.  

Denis
08 View H
Salem WI

Denis
Paddock Lake, WI


From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> on behalf of Don Phillipe <donphillipe@...>
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2021 6:25:41 PM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain
 
On Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 03:09 PM, David Harper wrote:
now that I have mine sorted mostly
If I didn't make that clear, I would literally fight someone over mine and if one day it goes over a cliff and I'm still alive to tell it, I'll be scouring the Internet  as soon as I get out of the hospital to find another model just exactly like it.   I wouldn't have a new one if you gave it to me though (DPF, DEF, et. al.) and if you gifted me a new one I'd sell it and if something was wrong with this one, I'd buy another one exactly like I had before.
 
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

bike_for_life2003
 

Glenn,

Congratulations on your 06H ... we love ours which we bought three years ago with 76K miles on the clock and had a bumper-to-bumper check by the M-B dealer including new brakes and transmission service in conjunction with the 80K service.  I won't bore you or others here will all the fixes/mods we have made since then... Send me a PM if you want a more detailed description.  

Regarding intermittent issues, they are indeed vexing.  When I flew jets in the Air Force, one of the things I hated to see in the aircraft forms before flight was a write-up for a problem and the maintenance folks had signed it off with the dreaded "CND" (could not duplicate)...  

As for not being able to go over 55 mph, we had a similar problem during a trip to two funerals last October.   It turned out to be a failing ABS controller but we didn't know it at the time.   There was a lot of wind and I thought our ability to get over 60 mph was related to that.... In retrospect it wasn't.  About 15 miles from our planned first night's stop the CEL illuminated with no performance degradation or other indications... INITIALLY.   Before I could to a rest area or off ramp to investigate one by one all lights on the dash related to brakes, etc. illuminated... what we pilots call "Christmas Tree"....  First job.. maintain vehicle control... Second, analyze the situation and take corrective action... Third, land as soon as conditions permit.  Another catch-phrase in the aviation world is "Aviate, Navigate, Communicate"...  

I drove carefully into the campground outside Montgomery, AL and immediately got on the internet to see what might be the problem.  I was hoping maybe a fuse had blown or a circuit breaker had popped.  No luck.  Next morning I called one company which advertised they serviced Sprinter fleets but they didn't answer promptly and then said they couldn't help.  Then called Jack Ingram M-B in Montgomery and huge kudos to them for working us into their maintenance schedule.  Huge shout out to them for helping us in our time of need.

The View started and ran normally at idle and moving out of the campground but it would not shift above 2nd gear.  I drove 13 miles to the dealer at 40 mph and high RPM...  not fun on the interstate but I wasn't familiar with the area so had to follow the GPS steering.

Turned out the ABS controller had apparently failed (electronically) because the dealer's cosmic analysis tools showed no communication between the ABS controller and the ECU (engine control unit).  Turns out that without wheel speed inputs through the ABS controller, the transmission control unit (TCU) and ECU revert to survival mode.  

We needed a new ABS controller and the dealer did not have one on hand but found one at the M-B depot in Jacksonville which they ordered for overnight delivery.  We spent an unexpected night in a hotel but next morning the new controller was installed, brakes were bled, and we were on our way.  

This was the only major issue we have had in 25K miles with this View or 25K with our previous RV, 99 Rialta.  We have a very comprehensive roadside assistance program so rest easy that we would be well cared for if we broke down... though that hasn't happened yet.

As an aside, I did find out that the failed ABS controller can be rebuilt for much less than we paid for the new one.  I may choose to do that to have a spare but am leaning toward donating it to a tech who does lots of work and may be able to save a customer some big bucks.  

I'm not a huge fan of preemptive transmission replacement but we are doing a complete motor front-end overhaul (new Bosch alternator, hoses, water pump, turbo resonator, pulleys, serpentine belt, etc) plus transmission/torque converter and differential service in the next couple of weeks.  We just hit 100K miles so this should reset the clock for the next 100K, eh?

Bottom Line:  We have had superb service from our 06 View (don't tow or travel overweight) and expect it to give us many more happy miles down the road. Keeping to the M-B schedule for maintenance rather than waiting till something is broken to fix it is key.... The military and all fleet owners know this very well... 
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


Re: Rear Wheel Speed Sensor Failure Investigation

stenor
 

Did anyone get their recall notice this week? I did not.

Steve N
2019 24G
previously 2006 23H



Sent from my Galaxy


Re: Sold my '16 "V" model

airauxcoastie
 

We had a '06 View H that was replaced by a 25' travel trailer so that we could take three of our grandchildren on adventures. The TT has a deep (38") dinette slide, bunk beds, and a queen size Murphy bed that was very livable for monthlong excursions with the grandkids. We never could have done that in the View. 

As a side note, we found the View to be a reliable unit with no major repairs needed. It was traded in 2015 with 64K miles.

Ray in S.E. Michigan


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Denis Druker
 

I bought a 2008 model H with 18000 miles 7 years ago.  We spend the winters in Florida in it.  Drive it on a fall trip to the southeast.  Have crossed the Rockys three times. Over 80000 miles now as I write this message from Inverness FL.   The converter is the only item that has failed. My theory is that if these things are not used they will give you especially electrical problems.  -- same as a boat or a car.  If you buy one with extensive storage time - beware.  

Denis
08 View H
Salem WI

Denis
Paddock Lake, WI


From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> on behalf of Don Phillipe <donphillipe@...>
Sent: Friday, February 26, 2021 6:25:41 PM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain
 
On Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 03:09 PM, David Harper wrote:
now that I have mine sorted mostly
If I didn't make that clear, I would literally fight someone over mine and if one day it goes over a cliff and I'm still alive to tell it, I'll be scouring the Internet  as soon as I get out of the hospital to find another model just exactly like it.   I wouldn't have a new one if you gave it to me though (DPF, DEF, et. al.) and if you gifted me a new one I'd sell it and if something was wrong with this one, I'd buy another one exactly like I had before.
 
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Don Phillipe
 

On Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 03:09 PM, David Harper wrote:
now that I have mine sorted mostly
If I didn't make that clear, I would literally fight someone over mine and if one day it goes over a cliff and I'm still alive to tell it, I'll be scouring the Internet  as soon as I get out of the hospital to find another model just exactly like it.   I wouldn't have a new one if you gave it to me though (DPF, DEF, et. al.) and if you gifted me a new one I'd sell it and if something was wrong with this one, I'd buy another one exactly like I had before.
 
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Glenn Franco
 

Don I Agee  whole heart atidlee!
Glenn 

On Fri, Feb 26, 2021, 4:26 PM Don Phillipe <donphillipe@...> wrote:
Still all the pattern analysis in the world as well as onsite unlimited root cause analysis won't solve an intermittent failure "always".   You have to diagnose those when the function is failing.    That's why on a mainframe computer when it encounters a series of intermittent errors, PD most of the time is resolved by swapping a duplicate board from one section of the machine to another, as that intermittent failure then shows up in the error logs as being in another location if the failing component was properly identified. (If there is no duplicate board in the machine, then the company parts house is hit for a trial of a new board.)   Shot gun and guessing are sometimes all that is available to a service person for intermittent electrical problems.  It's tough for anyone, even with a crystal ball to out-smart random failures.   And just like the computer repairman who has a company parts house at his disposal, it's easiest for the mechanic working at a dealership repairing his own vehicle because he keeps "sapping until he drops" using his parts house as a resource.  Your situation, however is that you must "buy a new component with each new trial until you drop" if you encounter an intermittent.

Otherwise my opinion is that not many are seriously interested in putting forth any real effort when it comes to truly analyzing failures.  They just want it fixed and not to spend too much money in the process. In other social media forums when I've suggesting building a 3 LED test jig to show voltage being present on certain components during an intermittant engine starter failure and suggesting the lamp data will pinpoint the failure area, I get my standard reaction which is dead silence or some snide remark because xyz group boss hog did not think of it.    But I digress.

A side note on transmission condition for you.  During the oil change the filter should be broken open and the amount of metal of each type found should be analyzed for quantity.   Aluminum will collect in the filter fabric and at about a quarter thimbleful for each oil change is normal and up to a full one if frequently pulling a toad through the mountains.   Chips of aluminum get knocked off the  clutch drum of the planetary clutch carrier during the shifting (up or down when under load) of the NAG1 transmission and are a natural part of wear.  After a few hundred thousand miles in an extremely stressful application like our vehicles, the clutches will eventually not be able to easily slide down the drum grooves and thus the transmission can't shift any longer and at that point this clutch drum can be removed and either hand worked to smooth out the tracks or be replaced at around $300 I think, plus labor. Metal shavings of different types generate different concerns and steel and brass shavings come from the bands and other internal parts and are more serious.  The steel particles catch on the magnet and the brass simply pool at the bottom of the pan and inside the filter fabric.   So don't let anyone sell you a transmission rebuild just because you see some aluminum in the pan or filter.   Additionally dip your finger into the oil and even on the dipstick and enough to get a good sniff and from this you determine what a transmission has been through with previous driving conditions since the last oil change.  This also works while shopping for vehicles (aux dipstick tool is needed to be purchased for NAG1 oil level checking).  The oil will smell burned if the transmission has been overheated since the last service.   Otherwise many improvements have been made to after market parts available when rebuilding a NAG1.   That is why I am always shocked when people boast of buying a new one from Mercedes.   The old one didn't work out so well so why would they want another one just like it?   The rebuild techniques over the years are full of improvements and there is also a heavy duty torque converter now available to fix the weakest link in that transmission, per what I have been told by a shop owner.   There are also many other improvements that can be made if you want to invest the money and effort rather than just buy some poorly assembled bargain-one off a re-builder's manufacturing line if you later encounter a breakdown.  Here is an example of a NAG1 with about 75K miles of normal wear (groves have not pronounced to a level of concern yet):



Everything else aside, I think though if you like the vehicle you should keep it.

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

David Harper
 

I definitely would not buy another one, but now that I have mine sorted mostly, I really like the way it drives. I've added a lot ot things and changed a lot of things. Most important is suspension. I've had many of the same issues as others on the forum, but I've been able to do most of the repairs and upgrades myself. When it is over my head, I have a good RV shop in my town that has helped out. I'm hoping to keep it running for a few more years. Most of my travel is short trips and east coast. I do not tow. It has been a love-hate relationship, but right now, I love it! I'm retired now, so my time is my own. If I were still working, I might not be so willing to deal with the problems, but at this point, it gives me something to do!

David Harper
2008 View J Central Florida 41k miles

On Feb 26, 2021, at 5:00 PM, younglr98 via groups.io <younglr98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

FWIW. Most “chatter” on this forum is problem based. There is always more complaints than complements; an American human frailty.
I bought my 07VJ with 80k miles, all service done as scheduled except tranny fluid done every 40k; current recommendation.
I do nearly all my own service, and have 170k hard miles including boondocking 50-60 days/ year at ski areas.
My tranny grenaded at 130k. With new tranny, MB rebuild, I added stacked plate cooler with 650cfm thermo switched fan, industrial filter with temp sensor.
I’ve had no other major failures. Just replaced the boost solenoid after 9 years.
I do not tow but do run 7-800# heavy.
Tranny is weakest link in your vintage. Do fluid changes including torque converter every 40k mi. Drive it!!!! They like to travel! My 2 cents
Roger 07VJ N ID ski area.





Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Don Phillipe
 

On Fri, Feb 26, 2021 at 02:07 PM, Lee Haefele wrote:
The boost solenoid normal use
The environment though has aborted normalcy when the alternator stops functioning.   Without regard to design, electrons flow from the higher voltage resource to the lower voltage resource and in this scenario with a generator running it becomes the house converter voltage of the converter flowing over to the lower potential or voltage level now (abnormal condition) found on the chassis battery.    So I think it just gets into semantics regarding if something was designed or not for a particular purpose or it just coincidentally works in a previously unfathomable manner. 

To reiterate, I ran for a month with my alternator out and didn't even know it.    I do have a hefty solar panel array and I don't drive at night.

I don't know what you call it when something not functioning as designed switches over to providing some undocumented benefit.  My best guess though is "lucky".
 
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Re: Texas Freeze

hikerbuddy01
 

Changed the fuel filter.  That didn't help.  Taking the RV to Dodge on Wednesday.
--
Bob
'08NH
TX


Re: Which Scan Tool?

bike_for_life2003
 

Not surprised the AP200 won't trigger off the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) number... Aahh, alliteration eh?  Most of these gadgets like our Bosch 1050 only allow one "free" registration.  I will probably purchase the SRS and ABS functions if I need them some day.  In the meantime, I'm loving our Nautabox for real time read outs including TFT!
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


Re: Reliability 2006 Navion on 2005 Sprinter Body Drivetrain

Lee Haefele
 

This statement needs clarification to match the problem Glenn is having.  It is correct with a functioning alternator, but with a disabled alternator, the boost solenoid is the only source/connection of chassis battery charging from the RV converter, by running the genset.  Note, battery switch by door must be toggled to ON.  The emergency workaround charging then routes from the converter, through the solenoid, to the chassis battery.
“The boost solenoid has nothing to do with keeping the engine battery charged. The boost solenoid normal use is to keep your house battery charged. It can be used to provide more electrical starting power in the event your engine battery is low. But this condition should not be normal”

Lee Haefele

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