Date   

Parasitic Battery Draw

Roy Grout
 

I just installed a battery monitor so now have some more information to confuse me. With everything I can think of turned of, the battery monitor still shows a steady draw of 0.5 amps on the house batteries. I confirmed this using a clip on ammeter on the battery ground cable. When I turn off the coach battery switch at the coach doorway the current draw goes down to .030 amps so would seem that something in the coach circuits is using the power. Would appreciate any thoughts on where the 0.5 amps is going or how I can trace it. Before taking the measurements I made sure the batteries were fully charged and shut off all of the following:
Solar panel
Propane valve
TV Bedroom
TV Salon
TV antenna
Jensen AV player
Inverter
Trik-L-Start ( I have a switch installed with it)
Chassis ground disconnect at brake pedal
Lights and fans
AC shore power 
Cab entertainment/GPS system

Thanks for any help or  advice

Roy Grout
West Vancouver BC, 2017 24G


Suspension questions.

Dennis Herrle
 

Has anyone installed the Fox Agile RIP suspension upgrade to their motor home? ( in case you are not familiar, new rear 4 to 6 leaf springs, new rear Fox Agile tuned rear shocks, new front struts with coil springs added and a few minor details to make it all work) ) I am considering doing so on my 2011 View K.
I have many questions:
Is this a reasonable up grade or just a come on?
Worth the ~$4000?
Other options?
What about air ride suspension upgrade?
Wife does not like the side to side roll or the current ride.
Our View has 65,500 mile and appears to have the original shocks and struts. Lots of side to side roll but general ride seems okay to me.

As always love the feedback and thanks in advance. Appears that shocks and struts are in short supply these days so the upgrade will have to be after I return from a cross country trip.

Dennis, 2011 View K 65,509 miles Tucson , AZ


Re: Can't get any tv channels

ken seigle
 

I thought so also, and removed mine. Then I saw that the connection came through the hole. 
Ken 06NH

On Saturday, August 8, 2020, 08:01:01 AM PDT, younglr98 via groups.io <younglr98@...> wrote:


I’d ditto to Skip that I replaced cable from mast to connector in roof due to bad corrosion in OEM connection.  You really have to remove baseplate and recaulk to do this. Roger 07VJ E WA



Re: Can't get any tv channels

ken seigle
 

I agree, but had to fix my connection under base, as corroded.

On Saturday, August 8, 2020, 07:54:49 AM PDT, younglr98 via groups.io <younglr98@...> wrote:


My friend who ran RV dealership 20 years and another service parts and repair business 6 years said “don’t replace your Winegard old crank up antenna unless it totally falls apart. With the UHF add on, it is far better than the fixed height King antenna popular now” Less vulnerable to injury etc. Just need digital TV, which is all you can get now.    Roger 07VJ E WA



Re: Can't get any tv channels

Todd Stock
 

No luck yet.  King asked me to check on roof for 12v.  Have it.  Also removed ceiling Cover and check connection there and at amplifier cover and tv.  All good.  Neighbor RV has King and gets channels.  Not sure why I haven't.  Tv is on air setting.


Re: Can't get any tv channels

younglr98
 

I’d ditto to Skip that I replaced cable from mast to connector in roof due to bad corrosion in OEM connection. You really have to remove baseplate and recaulk to do this. Roger 07VJ E WA


Re: Can't get any tv channels

younglr98
 

My friend who ran RV dealership 20 years and another service parts and repair business 6 years said “don’t replace your Winegard old crank up antenna unless it totally falls apart. With the UHF add on, it is far better than the fixed height King antenna popular now” Less vulnerable to injury etc. Just need digital TV, which is all you can get now. Roger 07VJ E WA


Re: Solar for 08 View 24J

younglr98
 

I will add my experience. I’m an outlier who nearly only plugs in when parked at home in my shop. Original owner lived near AM Solar and had 100W with 8ga to combiner box on top of refer vent to MPPT below refer and 8ga to batteries. 3 years ago I replaced the 100 with 3 100w Hi efficiency “back wired”panels, 2 on common rails, and 4 way tilt feet I fabricated from 1/8” aluminum channel design by early member of forum. I added Bluesky i3000 mppt and separately a Bogart monitor(Trimetric). I’ve always had 2 Trojan T145 GC2 280ahr batteries. (Hi ahr value price). Last pair were 8 years old and probably didn’t need replacing.......another story.
VHB mounted per AM Solar method which I’ve posted here at least twice. I also replaced OEM converter with PD 4645. I’d use someone else’s converter if I did it today.
My rig is HIGHLY modified so I camp at ski areas 40-60 days with full H2O and gourmet galley. Winter kit on Norcold611 and non skid pads all over roof for clearing snow(dangerous work)
My 3 panels between “whale humps, bat wings,or whatever is current jargon.” I like 3 panels for failure safety. A stone takes out 1 big panel, you’re toast. Likely rare occurrence I admit.
In Winter in N ID I tilt panels 70° and some days can recharge from 60-70% SOC with limited 4 hrs sun. Generator required in Winter no matter how big your solar in this venue. Not interested in big inverter or $10k system. Works for me. In Summer 300w plenty adequate for me and previous 100w fine where I camp.
Tilt ability truly only needed in Winter for snow shedding and short term max gain. If you use solar aiming software, nearly always best position for full day gain is Flat!
Just my simple perspective.
Roger 07VJ E WA 174,000mi


Re: Can't get any tv channels

retfeds@...
 

Todd,
Probably not your TV, but worth checking if you have (or can borrow) one to test reception. I have an 07VH with the King antenna , installed about 5 years ago. Prior to searching for channels, do you see any signal strength lights when you rotate the antenna to tune it? If you are not getting any strength lights, it could be either the amplifier or the antenna, or a bad connection. If the amp light is on you can check voltage output quite easily and eliminate that as a possible problem. Connection problems are not that easy to find. After beginning my installation years ago, I found the old antenna connection loose and corroded where it connects to the main cable right under the antenna mast.. I decided to install the King even after finding the source of my antenna problem. If you decide to check that connection or need to replace the antenna, it requires removing the old dicor sealant, so have a tube handy for reassembly.
--
Skip
07VH
East TN


Re: Can't get any tv channels

 

Kent el al,

BLUF:  There is a LOT of confusion regarding digital vs analog TV and antennas. 

The antenna on our 06 View is not analog nor is it digital... It is simply an antenna.... The original Winegard Sensar amplified antenna we had on our 99 Rialta worked FINE for digital TV and the one on our 05 View does, too. 

The issue is the TV... if it is analog (like the old tube type) you will need a digital-to-analog converter... but YOU WILL NOT need a new antenna. 

The US transitioned to fully digital TV in 2009.  This allowed more channels to be broadcast over any particular frequency.  Some are still broadcast on VHF but many, if not most, today are on UHF. 

The antenna array on the Winegard Sensar (sometimes called Bat Wing) that many of us have on the V/N is perfectly capable of pulling in UHF signals but it is not optimized for such.  With the transition and huge move to UHF broadcast frequencies, Winegard introduced a clip-on array for the Sensar antenna which provides an array better suited to the shorter wavelength of UHF signals.  

We could get plenty of digital channels on the digital TV in our 06 View with the OEM Winegard Sensar (batwing) antenna but installing the clip-on UHF array improved reception.

Happy Trails,

Paul and Chris
06 View 23H in NW FL


Re: Solar for 08 View 24J

Sherman Johnson
 

Hi Don,

I appreciate the info -- but we already have all the panels we can fit on our roof -- 2 each 100W Grape Solar.

When we bought our 2009 View used in 2012 it came with a satellite TV antenna on it -- it's just behind the cab-over.  Had it not been there I might have installed another panel.

We used the sat antenna at first but haven't for the last couple years.  We used to have DirecTV here at home, so it was a simple matter to bring a receiver with us in the View.  We switched back to cable a couple years ago though.  Of course, the sat TV  companies will allow you to use their service monthly -- we just haven't done that since going back to cable.  We don't watch much TV when traveling/camping.

Another issue with maximizing solar is walking around on the roof.  Even the two panels I installed are in the way somewhat, but I can still get around them.  If I had a panel where the sat antenna is, it would make cleaning the cab-over and skylight more difficult.  I like to have access to the A/C unit, the antenna, bathroom fan, skylight, cab-over, etc, for cleaning and maintenance. 

So removing the sat antenna is an option but from our experience, we could have 800W of solar and much of the time it would not matter because we camp in the woods, and/or we are in areas that are often cloudy.

In addition, we tend to drive daily.  That will not always be enough to recharge the lithium batteries, but it usually will.  2 hours driving = 100Ah.  So as a practical matter, even if we had 400-800W of solar -- and we had sunshine every day -- we usually wouldn't need it.  We do dry camp and boondock but usually just overnight.  If we do stay put for more than a day we are usually at a campground or friend/family member's house where we have shore power.

That's just us.  As you said, "There seem too many factors to lay out the best process as a general rule."  That's exactly right!  Those who boondock and stay in one (sunny) location for awhile will obviously really enjoy having a decent solar power system.  That's just not us -- not currently anyway.

I suppose by definition many people who own RVs -- especially nice ones like the V/N -- have money and often like to brag about how much stuff cost, mention name brands, etc.  There seems to be a competition among those people.  I'm a blue-collar guy, a retired 'automatic train control' (ATC) technician.  No doubt my income was/is at the low end of all V/N owners.  My wife and I chose not to have kids, and we made a decent profit on a couple rental properties.  We live in an old log cabin (no starter castle here) and our cars are between 20 and 27 years old, so I was able to save some money and have enough left over to buy the View.  I think it's stupid to spend a bunch of money on overpriced stuff just to have bragging rights.

I thought it was common knowledge that more than one charging source is OK.  One potential issue though is that since chargers use voltage to determine which stage to use, one charger can "fool" another.   After we've driven for a while, the GC batteries have a pretty good charge, but not 100% -- because the voltage is too low.  Still, if I start the generator, the MS2000 sees the GC batteries at (say) 13.6V and goes directly to float.  I need to run a load like the water heater for a couple minutes to knock the voltage down so the MS2000 will go into bulk -- or at least absorption.

I'm surprised people thought 2 charge controllers = bad.

I agree that if a person intends to rely on solar they should just max out the panels.

I used 84 sq.in. of VHB 4950 for each panel.  2 each 21" long pieces of 2x2x1/8" aluminum angle with the side in contact with the roof covered with 2" wide VHB tape.  One thing that was not mentioned at the time was covering the edges of the tape with roof sealant.  I need to do that.  Luckily, the View fits in our garage -- so it stays in pretty good shape. 

We have a Morningstar PWM controller.  What I read at the time suggested that for low power, low voltage arrays, PWM was fine, and maybe even better than MPPT.

Right now though, I'm focused on the UT1300 batteries and finding a good B2B charger and battery monitor.  I got the mil-spec battery lugs today.  I think they will work.

Sherman

On 8/7/2020 6:40 PM, old_b4_my_time wrote:

I have quit providing advice because people are too hard to pin.  There seem too many factors to lay out the best process as a general rule.   While solar equipment is fastly becoming a cottage industry, there’s still a great deal of marketing to be applied with the standard “name brand” mentality and price tag comparisons and always the same human need to brag about one’s system name or the money spent while sitting around the community campfire.  And when you apply peer-pressure, well actually all logic may be out the window.  So what’s the use LOL.  However, looking at you and comparing to me and noting we both are in older coaches this means (likely) we have what we want now and the new car smell and name branding is not something that we focus on.   So here, I’d say that just about anything today that has a descent approval rating on the Amazon or Home Depot websites is likely going to work for you.   

 

The Grape Solar panels are the ones I chose and that’s because I experienced the same type of interaction with that company as @Dale explained above.   In fact I spent a week in Ugene, OR three years ago after first having stopped by AMS to receive the “you are lucky to be here” sales pitch for a system costing 8x what I could spend on do-it-yourself.   It only took a couple of phone calls to Grape Solar there in Ugene for me to know that plan B was more tuned to my needs.  They also made me aware of an upcoming “scratch and dent sale” that weekend where I was able to drop by and equip myself in 450W of solar for under $600 with brackets and controllers included.  In fact the engineers there were the only ones at that time who said that having multiple controllers, one for each size panel “group” was not going to show the controllers “fighting with each other” as went the old wives tale that had been spread around for years previously.   Even Will P and more are now going with this idea of multiple controllers being OK, something that thanks to GS, I as a frontiersman implemented such 3 years ago and have been quite happy with since.

 

My thought process at the time was since I had that vast swath of open space in the front of my J between the two “sport fins”, and since the 300W single panel fit perfectly in there, this made the most sense to me personally.   And 300W probably could have been enough but half way out of curiosity and half way out of my odd need to defy trends, I wanted to add more wattage and without the option of duplicating exactly the same real-estate I occupied with the massive 300W panel, I decided to experiment and add a smaller panel with its own additional controller, if only to challenge conventional wisdom.   I was pleasantly surprised.  My only test involved “fusing up” the two controllers (one for the 300W and one for the 150W) at mid-day on a cloudless high-noon under a Texas sky with the batteries sitting at about a 70% SOC which showed on the Victron BMV-702 about 22A from the large panel and 10A from the smaller.   This is really the only way to test these, as they start producing at sun-up and have my dual GC2 bank fully charged on most mornings by 10-11AM and after recovering from my “dawn low reading” of normally a 60-75% SOC on the two GC2’s.   So thus why it’s best when testing to wait until full sunlight to get an idea of the maximum charge current you can see out of your system and that’s while “hitting hardest and suddenly” a significantly discharged bank.

 

Now while some come armed with power surveys or energy calculation profiles, this is a bit futile in that there is no way you will ever be over powered with your solar setup because until there is never another cloud in the sky, you will never have a solar system that for the long term is over-kill.   And while 200W may get you through one of my own experienced 24hr power-use periods, it’s not so good when those stray clouds are floating around, as for every hole in a cloudy sky that opens up, there you are with 400W producing a charge twice that of a  200W setup during that small window of a break in cloud cover.   So basically it is my suggestion to skip the power survey and just put all the solar you can afford on top.    I will say with 3 years now full-timing, that one can learn to live in a 100% boondocking environment with such a setup if you are careful to budget energy use (450W & 230aH lead-acid).  A compressor driven refrigerator, however, changes all the dynamics here.   Such a device pretty much chains the occupant to the coach to be ready to make emergency power moves during longer periods of lack of sunshine and a newly assigned “power station engineer” must always be available to seek out a more reliable power source or running generator/alternator in such an environment.   There is in effect without a rented power pole, no way to take any sizable “vacation from the vacation” when parking your vehicle for a period of a week or more if you are boondocking.  

 

For installation I recommend the proper grade VHB tape, perfectly cleaned surfaces and covering each mounting foot with a heavy coat of lap sealant, all on top of a properly cleaned surface.  (More info here: https://view-naviontech.groups.io/g/discussion/message/53892 )   This is the procedure I used.    And I do not present this to contest anyone other than to say I did it “this way”, completed all the work alone and I saved money.  I also can brag that I can full-time with this setup without a power pole in the picture and I am quite happy while never having any issue with my setup other than bird poop.   However I would someday consider a better refrigerator, as especially during this COVID crisis where I have been cooking like never before.   But even prior to this recent crisis I had found that camping in remote places, it is nice to maintain a full gourmet kitchen because there is really no need to not eat elegantly just because there are no restaurants nearby and if you get good enough at becoming your own chef, you would not want to downgrade by going out to a restaurant (assuming we ever can do so again).   For this reason I might one day consider a compressor fridge but only if I had upgraded to a 200aH-400aH lifepo4 battery bank and that’s because I wouldn’t like to worry all the time if my refrigerator is defrosting from running out of solar power while I am away on some kind of excursion.

 

As a final point, I share this video and while I don’t particularly like the way this guy thinks (he always designs his RV systems the way he would a regular home or building, using higher voltage battery setups and mounting everything on boards as big as conventional strip-mall wiring closets, while always leaning toward an “inverter-only” solution).  And with all that said, I did enjoy this video that illustrated with actual tests what I am talking about and how spending so much money on a controller is not always necessary.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kF_cVEYxj3E

In fact it was my guess this might be true when I purchased the $20 PWM controller for my 150W panel initially.   All the solar controllers he tests in this video seem to have around the same level of output per the same set of solar panels and true, while a MPPT might squeeze a few more amps during sun-rise or sun-set, spending a lot of money may not be as justifiable after viewing this video.   If anything, getting those panels in the sky, setting up a $15 PWM controller for each group of sizes is going to make you so delighted that later on you can perhaps buy one of the ultra expensive line, test for a week and then return to Amazon if you discover it’s not buying you anything.  

Anyway .... best of luck to you with your project .... Enjoy!


--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Re: Can't get any tv channels

ken seigle
 

I have my original Wineguard bat wing antenna. All I had to do was add the UHF part to the mast, and take out the old tv, and get a digital TV. Nothing wrong with the bat wing. I get about 30 over the air here.
Ken 06 NH

On Friday, August 7, 2020, 02:00:52 PM PDT, Kent Bradford <kentsbradford@...> wrote:


What year is your unit?  Ours is a 2006 and the antennae is analog.  We had to use a digital converter box to convert analog to digital signal.  Not sure when they converted over to digital antennae or how to check...we had one and tried it when we didn’t have a signal (we are the 2nd owner so we didn’t know for sure and couldn’t find in any manuals).   I didn’t think about this when i saw your original post.

Kent
06 NH KY


Re: Solar for 08 View 24J

Don Phillipe
 

I have quit providing advice because people are too hard to pin.  There seem too many factors to lay out the best process as a general rule.   While solar equipment is fastly becoming a cottage industry, there’s still a great deal of marketing to be applied with the standard “name brand” mentality and price tag comparisons and always the same human need to brag about one’s system name or the money spent while sitting around the community campfire.  And when you apply peer-pressure, well actually all logic may be out the window.  So what’s the use LOL.  However, looking at you and comparing to me and noting we both are in older coaches this means (likely) we have what we want now and the new car smell and name branding is not something that we focus on.   So here, I’d say that just about anything today that has a descent approval rating on the Amazon or Home Depot websites is likely going to work for you.   

 

The Grape Solar panels are the ones I chose and that’s because I experienced the same type of interaction with that company as @Dale explained above.   In fact I spent a week in Ugene, OR three years ago after first having stopped by AMS to receive the “you are lucky to be here” sales pitch for a system costing 8x what I could spend on do-it-yourself.   It only took a couple of phone calls to Grape Solar there in Ugene for me to know that plan B was more tuned to my needs.  They also made me aware of an upcoming “scratch and dent sale” that weekend where I was able to drop by and equip myself in 450W of solar for under $600 with brackets and controllers included.  In fact the engineers there were the only ones at that time who said that having multiple controllers, one for each size panel “group” was not going to show the controllers “fighting with each other” as went the old wives tale that had been spread around for years previously.   Even Will P and more are now going with this idea of multiple controllers being OK, something that thanks to GS, I as a frontiersman implemented such 3 years ago and have been quite happy with since.

 

My thought process at the time was since I had that vast swath of open space in the front of my J between the two “sport fins”, and since the 300W single panel fit perfectly in there, this made the most sense to me personally.   And 300W probably could have been enough but half way out of curiosity and half way out of my odd need to defy trends, I wanted to add more wattage and without the option of duplicating exactly the same real-estate I occupied with the massive 300W panel, I decided to experiment and add a smaller panel with its own additional controller, if only to challenge conventional wisdom.   I was pleasantly surprised.  My only test involved “fusing up” the two controllers (one for the 300W and one for the 150W) at mid-day on a cloudless high-noon under a Texas sky with the batteries sitting at about a 70% SOC which showed on the Victron BMV-702 about 22A from the large panel and 10A from the smaller.   This is really the only way to test these, as they start producing at sun-up and have my dual GC2 bank fully charged on most mornings by 10-11AM and after recovering from my “dawn low reading” of normally a 60-75% SOC on the two GC2’s.   So thus why it’s best when testing to wait until full sunlight to get an idea of the maximum charge current you can see out of your system and that’s while “hitting hardest and suddenly” a significantly discharged bank.

 

Now while some come armed with power surveys or energy calculation profiles, this is a bit futile in that there is no way you will ever be over powered with your solar setup because until there is never another cloud in the sky, you will never have a solar system that for the long term is over-kill.   And while 200W may get you through one of my own experienced 24hr power-use periods, it’s not so good when those stray clouds are floating around, as for every hole in a cloudy sky that opens up, there you are with 400W producing a charge twice that of a  200W setup during that small window of a break in cloud cover.   So basically it is my suggestion to skip the power survey and just put all the solar you can afford on top.    I will say with 3 years now full-timing, that one can learn to live in a 100% boondocking environment with such a setup if you are careful to budget energy use (450W & 230aH lead-acid).  A compressor driven refrigerator, however, changes all the dynamics here.   Such a device pretty much chains the occupant to the coach to be ready to make emergency power moves during longer periods of lack of sunshine and a newly assigned “power station engineer” must always be available to seek out a more reliable power source or running generator/alternator in such an environment.   There is in effect without a rented power pole, no way to take any sizable “vacation from the vacation” when parking your vehicle for a period of a week or more if you are boondocking.  

 

For installation I recommend the proper grade VHB tape, perfectly cleaned surfaces and covering each mounting foot with a heavy coat of lap sealant, all on top of a properly cleaned surface.  (More info here: https://view-naviontech.groups.io/g/discussion/message/53892 )   This is the procedure I used.    And I do not present this to contest anyone other than to say I did it “this way”, completed all the work alone and I saved money.  I also can brag that I can full-time with this setup without a power pole in the picture and I am quite happy while never having any issue with my setup other than bird poop.   However I would someday consider a better refrigerator, as especially during this COVID crisis where I have been cooking like never before.   But even prior to this recent crisis I had found that camping in remote places, it is nice to maintain a full gourmet kitchen because there is really no need to not eat elegantly just because there are no restaurants nearby and if you get good enough at becoming your own chef, you would not want to downgrade by going out to a restaurant (assuming we ever can do so again).   For this reason I might one day consider a compressor fridge but only if I had upgraded to a 200aH-400aH lifepo4 battery bank and that’s because I wouldn’t like to worry all the time if my refrigerator is defrosting from running out of solar power while I am away on some kind of excursion.

 

As a final point, I share this video and while I don’t particularly like the way this guy thinks (he always designs his RV systems the way he would a regular home or building, using higher voltage battery setups and mounting everything on boards as big as conventional strip-mall wiring closets, while always leaning toward an “inverter-only” solution).  And with all that said, I did enjoy this video that illustrated with actual tests what I am talking about and how spending so much money on a controller is not always necessary.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kF_cVEYxj3E

In fact it was my guess this might be true when I purchased the $20 PWM controller for my 150W panel initially.   All the solar controllers he tests in this video seem to have around the same level of output per the same set of solar panels and true, while a MPPT might squeeze a few more amps during sun-rise or sun-set, spending a lot of money may not be as justifiable after viewing this video.   If anything, getting those panels in the sky, setting up a $15 PWM controller for each group of sizes is going to make you so delighted that later on you can perhaps buy one of the ultra expensive line, test for a week and then return to Amazon if you discover it’s not buying you anything.  

Anyway .... best of luck to you with your project .... Enjoy!


--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Re: Can't get any tv channels

Kent Bradford
 

What year is your unit?  Ours is a 2006 and the antennae is analog.  We had to use a digital converter box to convert analog to digital signal.  Not sure when they converted over to digital antennae or how to check...we had one and tried it when we didn’t have a signal (we are the 2nd owner so we didn’t know for sure and couldn’t find in any manuals).   I didn’t think about this when i saw your original post.

Kent
06 NH KY


Re: Can't get any tv channels

Dinah Hayes
 

We had that issue and it was a loose wire under the kitchen sink cabinet.   Don't know of it's your problem,  but won't hurt to check connections.  
Dinah 2015NJ 

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020, 11:04 AM Todd Stock via groups.io <stocktl=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Yes. Antenna selected.  It's my home town. Usually have 14 channels on antenna.  I plan to pick up a indoor digital antenna to wire direct to tv to confirm TV is capable of receiving channels.  Trouble shooting diagram at King says to contact them due to possible bad antenna head.  In RV for next 11 days due to Sturgis Rally.  Need some News.  Thanks for help so far.  Will post results of testing and call to King


Re: Solar Panel Storage Qestion

David J
 

I have built solar power systems for remote communications sites for about 20 years. They degrade slowly over the first couple of years (generally, performance is about 105% of rated, when shipped) and then stabilize to less than 1% degradation per year. I don't think it matters whether they are in the sun or not. After 20 years they are typically at 80-85% of capacity. The degradation is due to impurities in the silicon wafer and can also include corrosion in the tabs and straps that connect the individual cells together. For good quality factory-made panels I can see no reason to take them down when not in use.


Solar Panel Storage Qestion

sstadler19
 

Related solar panel question. I have installed my 2 panels with clevis pins so that I can store them when the coach will be idle for more than a couple of months; I have power available. Does storing them in the box extend the life of the panels, or do they receive no more wear staying on the coach exposed to sunlight. If it doesn't matter I'll leave them up.
Thx,
Scott

On 08/07/2020 8:50 AM Dennis Foley via groups.io <dennisfoleyplumbing=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


More 2010J.


Re: Solar for 08 View 24J

Dennis Foley
 

More 2010J.


Re: Solar for 08 View 24J

Dennis Foley
 

I installed a complete set from AM Solar with one 170W 50A panel and a 100A MPPT controller, etc in my 2010J a few years ago The Kit came complete with wire, a rooftop junction box , breaker, shutoff, etc. I could add a second panel but never felt the need I placed the panel across the space between the 2 humps on the roof, and ran the wire into the cabinet above the sink, across to the cab edge and down into the wall between the cab and camper. The controls sit exposed on that wall on a piece of starboard. Later I added a Victron monitor and this year I change to 6volt batteries. I’ve never felt the need for an inverter, as we don’t watch TV when we are traveling. It’s perfect for me, but we don’t boondock too often, and if we do it’s usually only for a night or two. This setup, with a trick l start keeps my batteries charged during storage, as plugging in isn’t a great option for me

170W Victron Complete Charger
(50A)
0V50icAtron SmartSolar MPPT
100/50
Tilt Bar Set - 19.5"


Re: Can't get any tv channels

Todd Stock
 

Yes. Antenna selected.  It's my home town. Usually have 14 channels on antenna.  I plan to pick up a indoor digital antenna to wire direct to tv to confirm TV is capable of receiving channels.  Trouble shooting diagram at King says to contact them due to possible bad antenna head.  In RV for next 11 days due to Sturgis Rally.  Need some News.  Thanks for help so far.  Will post results of testing and call to King

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