Topics

That Kwikee step....


Wolfgang52
 

Roger,
Thank you once again!!!!! The gear box you suggested and the motor arrived and I followed your perfect instructions. The pigtail heads up was a life saver, I was thinking the plug on the motor. Still having my fingers is a big PLUS

The steps work like new and I have vowed to keep up with the lube!

Dickie
In NY
07VIEW J


bike_for_life2003
 

Jim,

Interesting how technologies can cross over... As an avid cyclist, years ago I learned about a neat technology for lubing my bike chains.. it goes on as a fluid but dries as a wax... Finish Line Teflon... works great, doesn't pick up dirt/grime.

I've also heard some good things about Boeshield T-9 but haven't used it.

Bottom Line:  IMO, lubricants designed for bike chains are a great option for Kwikee Steps...

Happy Trails!

Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


Steve
 

Kwikee, Kwik Lube is formulated for these steps. Available on Amazon, of course.....
           https://www.amazon.com/Kwikee-Products-905069000-Kwiklube-Grease/dp/B000BGOI92


Gordon
 

Grease Gun in a Can was recommended to me for use on the steps a long time ago......I have used it for over 10 years and highly recommend it!

Gordy 2008 View H
Wisconsin


Peter B. Masley
 

I will second Boeshield T-9. Very good lubricant and doesn’t attract dirt after it dries. My go to lubricant.

Peter
2010 Navion J
Alabama


JPS
 

Step pivot point lubes. I have used dri lube product from Roadmaster that is formulated for their tow hitch equipment. It is a silicone spray that does not contain and petrochemicals. Such products are a bit difficult to find once you read most dri lube ingredient list. A dri lube with no oil will serve the purpose and collect no dirt & grit etc.  We have a couple of sons and a couple of times each year I enlist their efforts to lube all step pivot points. When I first got our unit I used to do this task along with DW. These days much more a task for the younger generation. Jim 07VH FLO.


On Mon, Aug 24, 2020 at 11:29 AM younglr98 via groups.io <younglr98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dickie,
Yes you have an A assy gearbox. I'm pretty sure you have partially stripped gear, as I mentioned about "stuttering" or "chattering". The controller does shut off motor after 2-3 seconds in this situation, fortunately.
Getting to the gear is no big deal. Get a helper! Stay clear of the steps and get underneath. Find the connection on the pigtail NOT on the motor, unless you want to get an amputated finger! Staying clear of steps, have helper close door so steps begin to retract. disconnect the connector as step moves so you stop it partially retracted. Now you can get to the pin connecting arm to step. 
Some of us have replaced the clevis pin/cotter pin with a pin with the ball on the side and a keyring loop on the end. A small gauge aircraft cable is attached to that and run over to aft end of steps. I made a loop with a plastic tube as a handle. This is held to the bottom of the rig with a screw with enough slack so step can operate. In a step disaster, you can put a bottle jack under the step to put a little pressure on it to "unload" the step connection. Then you can pull the pin! STAY away from the steps when you do this!
Pull the 4 bolts on the backing plate to the assy and drop assy. Pull the bolts off the backing plate and take the back cover off the gear assy. You will see what to do. The pin that is the axle for the gear is free floating, don't lose it. Flip gear over so hopefully damaged area now is beyond the end of play. After reassembly to backing plate, you can test it on the ground by connecting back to pigtail and cycling the door. 
Lube ALL pivot points while steps are free and work it back and forth to get lube to penetrate all points.
KEEP YOUR STEPS LUBED!  If you don't hit anything with them, they will function fine for many, many, years.
Safe travels       Roger 07VJ S OR coast


Paul Rouis
 

I have good experience with Boeshield T-9. Originally developed for Boeing aircraft.

It penetrates into the linkages very well and leaves a waxy like coating in there that seems to stay but not attract dirt and road grime.

 

Paul

07VJNY

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Collogan
Sent: Tuesday, August 25, 2020 9:46 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] That Kwikee step....

 

And what type of lube for the step? Spray lithium,  or WD40 ?  

Speaking of lubes,  what would be recommended for slide lubricant? Thanks

 

On Mon, Aug 24, 2020, 11:29 AM younglr98 via groups.io <younglr98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dickie,

Yes you have an A assy gearbox. I'm pretty sure you have partially stripped gear, as I mentioned about "stuttering" or "chattering". The controller does shut off motor after 2-3 seconds in this situation, fortunately.

Getting to the gear is no big deal. Get a helper! Stay clear of the steps and get underneath. Find the connection on the pigtail NOT on the motor, unless you want to get an amputated finger! Staying clear of steps, have helper close door so steps begin to retract. disconnect the connector as step moves so you stop it partially retracted. Now you can get to the pin connecting arm to step. 

Some of us have replaced the clevis pin/cotter pin with a pin with the ball on the side and a keyring loop on the end. A small gauge aircraft cable is attached to that and run over to aft end of steps. I made a loop with a plastic tube as a handle. This is held to the bottom of the rig with a screw with enough slack so step can operate. In a step disaster, you can put a bottle jack under the step to put a little pressure on it to "unload" the step connection. Then you can pull the pin! STAY away from the steps when you do this!

Pull the 4 bolts on the backing plate to the assy and drop assy. Pull the bolts off the backing plate and take the back cover off the gear assy. You will see what to do. The pin that is the axle for the gear is free floating, don't lose it. Flip gear over so hopefully damaged area now is beyond the end of play. After reassembly to backing plate, you can test it on the ground by connecting back to pigtail and cycling the door. 

Lube ALL pivot points while steps are free and work it back and forth to get lube to penetrate all points.

KEEP YOUR STEPS LUBED!  If you don't hit anything with them, they will function fine for many, many, years.

Safe travels       Roger 07VJ S OR coast


 

And what type of lube for the step? Spray lithium,  or WD40 ?  
Speaking of lubes,  what would be recommended for slide lubricant? Thanks

On Mon, Aug 24, 2020, 11:29 AM younglr98 via groups.io <younglr98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dickie,
Yes you have an A assy gearbox. I'm pretty sure you have partially stripped gear, as I mentioned about "stuttering" or "chattering". The controller does shut off motor after 2-3 seconds in this situation, fortunately.
Getting to the gear is no big deal. Get a helper! Stay clear of the steps and get underneath. Find the connection on the pigtail NOT on the motor, unless you want to get an amputated finger! Staying clear of steps, have helper close door so steps begin to retract. disconnect the connector as step moves so you stop it partially retracted. Now you can get to the pin connecting arm to step. 
Some of us have replaced the clevis pin/cotter pin with a pin with the ball on the side and a keyring loop on the end. A small gauge aircraft cable is attached to that and run over to aft end of steps. I made a loop with a plastic tube as a handle. This is held to the bottom of the rig with a screw with enough slack so step can operate. In a step disaster, you can put a bottle jack under the step to put a little pressure on it to "unload" the step connection. Then you can pull the pin! STAY away from the steps when you do this!
Pull the 4 bolts on the backing plate to the assy and drop assy. Pull the bolts off the backing plate and take the back cover off the gear assy. You will see what to do. The pin that is the axle for the gear is free floating, don't lose it. Flip gear over so hopefully damaged area now is beyond the end of play. After reassembly to backing plate, you can test it on the ground by connecting back to pigtail and cycling the door. 
Lube ALL pivot points while steps are free and work it back and forth to get lube to penetrate all points.
KEEP YOUR STEPS LUBED!  If you don't hit anything with them, they will function fine for many, many, years.
Safe travels       Roger 07VJ S OR coast


Jake
 


I am glad you stressed the danger part as many don't know that this steps  can get you !!
Or to minimize risk, cycle the door and have your helper disconnect the battery cable. This is the chassis (van) battery that powers the steps. At least for my 07.  Just brainstorming here, haven't actually tried it!  ;)

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop


Wolfgang52
 

Rodger,

Thank you so much for your detailed description, it's paints a clear picture.

I went ahead and ordered the complete gear assembly from Amazon and should have it by the end of the week. I will use your instructions to get the old one out and replace it with the new. 

I will flip the old gear and keep that unit for and emergency spare. You have made my day!

I must be right at the sweet spot on this rig, last month I  had to replace the shaft on the slide. (the one the shear pin goes in)

This weekend lost 12 volt power while boon docking. Bolt holding wire to battery croded off.

BUT...still loving every minute of owning this beauty. Just hitting 140,000 miles.

Dickie
In NY
07View J



I must be right at the sweet spot on this rig, last month I had to replace the shift on the slide. (


waydigs
 

Roger:
Thanks !!  
This is the best outline of repairs to the step I have seen
I am glad you stressed the danger part as many don't know that this steps  can get you !!
Wayne
16"V" model


younglr98
 

Dickie,
Yes you have an A assy gearbox. I'm pretty sure you have partially stripped gear, as I mentioned about "stuttering" or "chattering". The controller does shut off motor after 2-3 seconds in this situation, fortunately.
Getting to the gear is no big deal. Get a helper! Stay clear of the steps and get underneath. Find the connection on the pigtail NOT on the motor, unless you want to get an amputated finger! Staying clear of steps, have helper close door so steps begin to retract. disconnect the connector as step moves so you stop it partially retracted. Now you can get to the pin connecting arm to step. 
Some of us have replaced the clevis pin/cotter pin with a pin with the ball on the side and a keyring loop on the end. A small gauge aircraft cable is attached to that and run over to aft end of steps. I made a loop with a plastic tube as a handle. This is held to the bottom of the rig with a screw with enough slack so step can operate. In a step disaster, you can put a bottle jack under the step to put a little pressure on it to "unload" the step connection. Then you can pull the pin! STAY away from the steps when you do this!
Pull the 4 bolts on the backing plate to the assy and drop assy. Pull the bolts off the backing plate and take the back cover off the gear assy. You will see what to do. The pin that is the axle for the gear is free floating, don't lose it. Flip gear over so hopefully damaged area now is beyond the end of play. After reassembly to backing plate, you can test it on the ground by connecting back to pigtail and cycling the door. 
Lube ALL pivot points while steps are free and work it back and forth to get lube to penetrate all points.
KEEP YOUR STEPS LUBED!  If you don't hit anything with them, they will function fine for many, many, years.
Safe travels       Roger 07VJ S OR coast


Wolfgang52
 

I'm glad I have read this. I changed my step motor a couple weeks ago and the steps worked fine, then out of the clear blue, they started to chatter a few seconds when the reached the open length. I went and put the old motor back in and they worked fine for a few open and closes and then they started to chatter when they hit the open position, same as with the new motor. I couldn't for the life of me figure what might cause this, being I knew when they hit the end there should be some kind of friction that causes the motor to stop.

Do you think that turning the gear over might help and is it a problem to get to the gear and turn it over? I am afraid if I let it keep chattering at the end of the run, that it will eventually ruin the gear. Does anyone know which gear box linkage the 2006 3500 Sprinter View would use? I see Amazon has one listed as  Kwikee 379160 Gear Box with A ("A" is embossed on the linkage arm)

Any insight would be of a great help to me and I thank you all in advance!!!

Dickie
IN NY
07View J

 

 


sstadler19
 

Great suggestions all.  So far I have gone with Lube, Lube, Lube.  The first time it worked once or twice but not all the time.  I went back and hit it again yesterday afternoon and it is now working flawlessly.  I'm not going to tempt fate yet, but if it stutters again I will check the condition of the gear and flip if needed.  I have had many times the step has been stopped prematurely by deep steps.

I referred to a retrofit that changed the gearing from plastic to metal in my model.  This was to stop a problem many of us were having on regular breakdowns of the step, which left it stuck in the in or out position and totally immobile.  I've had no issues with that since the change a few years ago.  It was done at a local Camping World.  Some of our more expert members can comment on the additional parts in the retrofit.  I will keep all advised, thanks so much!
Scott
08NH

On 08/23/2020 11:51 AM Terry Fenwick <terryfenwick2@...> wrote:


Well, I had a similar problem with my steps not retracting fully, but I am guilty of having caused the problem.
Back in February, while staying at Huntington Beach SP in Myrtle Beach, we had to have our transmission changed. We ordered in the rebuilt tranny from SilverStar Transmissions (from Oklahoma) and arranged for the transmission to be switched out at Tad's Transmission in North Myrtle Beach. Tad's was the only shop we found that had a 10 ton four post lift (the lift is outside the shop so the RV height on the lift is not a problem!) that can handle RVs. We arrived at 7am and backed onto the lift, the old tranny was out by noon, the new tranny arrived by FedEx at 1pm and was installed before the shop closed at 4pm.
Now for the step part! Because the step controller had quit on us, I had rigged up a simple extend/retract switch by the door (the switch was wired directly into the step motor). And on pulling out of the 4 post lift, I had left the step extended and the steps caught the front post and were pulled back a few inches out of alignment. Even in their badly misaligned state, the steps would retract about 3/4 back into storage position if I 'helped' push them into the retracted position.
We managed to travel back home with steps that did not fully retract.
Once at home, I used a chain around the steps to my small utility tractor to pull the steps mostly back into alignment such that they now fully retract and extend without any problem. I have also replaced the step controller and have put my jury rigged bypass switch into one of the View storage compartments (being ready for the next time the controller has a problem!).
All this to say that my experience with the steps not fully retracting is that it was caused by the step brackets and pivots jamming up and causing the motor to stop the retracting as the load on the motor became too large. So I would double check for the smooth functioning and easy movement of the steps as they retract. If the steps move easily, then I would suspect either the controller or the motor are malfunctioning. You can check the controller by wiring directly into the wire connections at the step motor... if the steps do, or do not, fully retract when you have bypassed the controller, then you have isolated the problem to either the controller or the motor.  
Terry  06 VH, Ontario
 

On 8/23/2020 2:19 PM, Jake via groups.io wrote:

My steps do the same thing, but both in and out. If I help them by applying gentle pressure with my foot,  they travel all the way to the correct position and seem to lock in place correctly. I usually hear a metal on metal noice (a “clunk”) during the process, possibly a gear in the motor slipping?

I have lubed mine but I’m not aware of the motor/wiring retrofit you mentioned. 

I carry a tie-down strap with me just in case the day comes when it strips out entirely and I have to strap the steps in so I can drive. I’ll be following this discussion much more closely than the slotted rotors. :)

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop



Virus-free. www.avast.com


younglr98
 

Ok guys, this is likely what you have. The gearbox has a large “pot metal” gear that drives the curved arm connected to your step. When it hits something before it is full out, it partially or fully strips some teeth.
(As an aside, my EE buddy says this shouldn’t happen, as the motor stops when the arm hits stops on the outer case and the force of hitting something foreign shouldn’t cause damage) a whole nother tech mental masturbation discussion.
When you “help” the step, it rotates thru the damaged area on the gear. Without assist, it sometimes gets past the bad area.
I’ve had 4-5 years service by flipping the gear 180° so the damage area is just outside the full rotation. Also, with a very small file, you may be able to rehab the damaged area. Kwikee does not stock this gear as a replacement. Have to buy the entire assy.
Punches point to 2 damaged areas. 1 old, so when I flipped it over, it was out of play. 2nd new damage now causes motor to stutter for 2-3 seconds after step out. Retracted fine with assist.
New assy I had on hand.
Roger 07VJ
currently Gold Beach OR
ps assy and drive motor available separately, however, check motor pinion gear to make sure it’s not damaged.


Terry Fenwick
 

Well, I had a similar problem with my steps not retracting fully, but I am guilty of having caused the problem.
Back in February, while staying at Huntington Beach SP in Myrtle Beach, we had to have our transmission changed. We ordered in the rebuilt tranny from SilverStar Transmissions (from Oklahoma) and arranged for the transmission to be switched out at Tad's Transmission in North Myrtle Beach. Tad's was the only shop we found that had a 10 ton four post lift (the lift is outside the shop so the RV height on the lift is not a problem!) that can handle RVs. We arrived at 7am and backed onto the lift, the old tranny was out by noon, the new tranny arrived by FedEx at 1pm and was installed before the shop closed at 4pm.
Now for the step part! Because the step controller had quit on us, I had rigged up a simple extend/retract switch by the door (the switch was wired directly into the step motor). And on pulling out of the 4 post lift, I had left the step extended and the steps caught the front post and were pulled back a few inches out of alignment. Even in their badly misaligned state, the steps would retract about 3/4 back into storage position if I 'helped' push them into the retracted position.
We managed to travel back home with steps that did not fully retract.
Once at home, I used a chain around the steps to my small utility tractor to pull the steps mostly back into alignment such that they now fully retract and extend without any problem. I have also replaced the step controller and have put my jury rigged bypass switch into one of the View storage compartments (being ready for the next time the controller has a problem!).
All this to say that my experience with the steps not fully retracting is that it was caused by the step brackets and pivots jamming up and causing the motor to stop the retracting as the load on the motor became too large. So I would double check for the smooth functioning and easy movement of the steps as they retract. If the steps move easily, then I would suspect either the controller or the motor are malfunctioning. You can check the controller by wiring directly into the wire connections at the step motor... if the steps do, or do not, fully retract when you have bypassed the controller, then you have isolated the problem to either the controller or the motor.  
Terry  06 VH, Ontario
 

On 8/23/2020 2:19 PM, Jake via groups.io wrote:

My steps do the same thing, but both in and out. If I help them by applying gentle pressure with my foot,  they travel all the way to the correct position and seem to lock in place correctly. I usually hear a metal on metal noice (a “clunk”) during the process, possibly a gear in the motor slipping?

I have lubed mine but I’m not aware of the motor/wiring retrofit you mentioned. 

I carry a tie-down strap with me just in case the day comes when it strips out entirely and I have to strap the steps in so I can drive. I’ll be following this discussion much more closely than the slotted rotors. :)

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop



Virus-free. www.avast.com


Jake
 

My steps do the same thing, but both in and out. If I help them by applying gentle pressure with my foot,  they travel all the way to the correct position and seem to lock in place correctly. I usually hear a metal on metal noice (a “clunk”) during the process, possibly a gear in the motor slipping?

I have lubed mine but I’m not aware of the motor/wiring retrofit you mentioned. 

I carry a tie-down strap with me just in case the day comes when it strips out entirely and I have to strap the steps in so I can drive. I’ll be following this discussion much more closely than the slotted rotors. :)

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop


sstadler19
 

Almost like going back to a simpler time after our awesome slottted brake, Nox sensor, and suspension discussions.  But a recurrent pain nonetheless...
My Kwikee step, which has had the gearing and wiring retrofit done, is not quite going back in all the way.  It comes out fine, but it is now less than 50/50 that it just won't tuck all the way in.  I've removed the step fabric and oiled all of the step pivot points as well as by the motor connection.  If I help it with my foot as it is moving in it will tuck in all the way.  If I do not it will stop almost all the way, but will be stuck in that position until the door is reopened, it will not just push in.   Interesting.  Is it just wearing out, or I missing something simple?  
Thanks all,

Scott
08NH