Topics

Dash Air Cond. blowing hot air.


David Seeds
 

2015 chassis blowing hot air, belt is good, compressor pulley is spinning, I can’t tell if clutch is engaged, failure appeared to happen at highway speed.
2016 J, I-4, Fl.
any help please, Dave.


Glenn Franco
 

The pulley will always spin but check the front to see if the clutch is pulling in to engage the compressor. Check all associated A/C hoses at the connections and look for any leakage of oil. Also check the HEVAC housing at the drain where the condensation drips out. The sign of refrigerant leakage would show up as refrigerant oil leakage at the joints or the HEVAC Drain. If you have the interest you can get a AC gauge set at harbor freight for a reasonable price.
I don't normally recommend those guys but for a 1 or 2 time use it would be worth having. With those you check check the pressures on the low and high sides.

Quick and dirty way to check for refrigerant in the lines is to take the larger of the 2 AC caps off and lightly press the schrader valve and see if pressure and refrigerant is released.
If refrigerant is released you may just have a low charge. A trip to Walmart or your local auto parts store will show a number of ways to add refrigerant. Stay away from the fancy high priced stuff. All you need is a short low side hose that comes with a can of 134A and the adapter on the end of the hose for the quick connect and can attachment.
These fill kits connect to the low side which has normally about 30psi of a charge. It will not connect to the high side which runs over 200psi so there is no chance of bursting the can.
Install the can to the hose, place the refrigerant can in a small bucket of warm water, connect the other end of the hose to the low side fitting. Start the vehicle and put the AC on High Recirculate. Hold the can upright if you can and you will be charging the system with the vapor pulled from the refrigerant can.
If the system has a low charge there will be enough refrigerant to allow the low pressure switch to close and pull the AC clutch in.
Good Luck
Glenn 06 23H Navion
Sounds like a low charge but hard to diagnose by email


On Thu, Aug 27, 2020 at 9:23 AM David Seeds via groups.io <dw_seeds=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
2015 chassis blowing hot air, belt is good, compressor pulley is spinning, I can’t tell if clutch is engaged, failure appeared to happen at highway speed.
2016 J, I-4, Fl.
any help please, Dave.


David Seeds
 

Glen, much info. thanks; the front of the comp. pulley assembly is spinning, at idle engaging the a c does not affect the engine. The clutch does not resemble the older style i.e. does not move or click when engaging. With eng. running the front of the compressor pulley does not change (always spinning) whether a c engaged or not.
Could the compressor have internal unloading?


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, 11:17 AM, Glenn Franco <brakey6666@...> wrote:

The pulley will always spin but check the front to see if the clutch is pulling in to engage the compressor. Check all associated A/C hoses at the connections and look for any leakage of oil. Also check the HEVAC housing at the drain where the condensation drips out. The sign of refrigerant leakage would show up as refrigerant oil leakage at the joints or the HEVAC Drain. If you have the interest you can get a AC gauge set at harbor freight for a reasonable price.
I don't normally recommend those guys but for a 1 or 2 time use it would be worth having. With those you check check the pressures on the low and high sides.

Quick and dirty way to check for refrigerant in the lines is to take the larger of the 2 AC caps off and lightly press the schrader valve and see if pressure and refrigerant is released.
If refrigerant is released you may just have a low charge. A trip to Walmart or your local auto parts store will show a number of ways to add refrigerant. Stay away from the fancy high priced stuff. All you need is a short low side hose that comes with a can of 134A and the adapter on the end of the hose for the quick connect and can attachment.
These fill kits connect to the low side which has normally about 30psi of a charge. It will not connect to the high side which runs over 200psi so there is no chance of bursting the can.
Install the can to the hose, place the refrigerant can in a small bucket of warm water, connect the other end of the hose to the low side fitting. Start the vehicle and put the AC on High Recirculate. Hold the can upright if you can and you will be charging the system with the vapor pulled from the refrigerant can.
If the system has a low charge there will be enough refrigerant to allow the low pressure switch to close and pull the AC clutch in.
Good Luck
Glenn 06 23H Navion
Sounds like a low charge but hard to diagnose by email

On Thu, Aug 27, 2020 at 9:23 AM David Seeds via groups.io <dw_seeds=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
2015 chassis blowing hot air, belt is good, compressor pulley is spinning, I can’t tell if clutch is engaged, failure appeared to happen at highway speed.
2016 J, I-4, Fl.
any help please, Dave.


Eric Resweber
 

Hey David,

 

I had a similar problem a few years back.  The dash A/C would start blowing hot air all of a sudden.  If I turned it off for 15-20 min. and then back on it would start cooling again.  Or, I could turn the temp. control down to the coldest setting and it would work.  But after a while it would get too cold so I’d have to turn it off.  Turning it up would result in hot air again.

The MB shop couldn’t replicate the problem even after 3 visits.  Finally, one other member here had the exact same symptoms.  Her shop was finally able to replicate the problem and wound up changing the entire control board--the controls on the dash.

I had to insist that my shop try this.  They didn’t want to without actually diagnosing the problem.  But I insisted.  It’s been a few years now and we haven’t had that problem since.

 

Eric & Chris

08 VB

Ps.  Hi to Cindy and Shirley

 


bike_for_life2003
 

Dave,

Have had this happen occasionally in our 06 View... seems the condenser can freeze up in very humid weather.  It always came back after turning the A/C for a few minutes then back on. 

I have a set of A/C gauges and checked our system and all pressures were within tolerances.  Beware of fast-fix recommendations to recharge the system from a bottle of R-134 from a big-box store... Overfilling can damage many of the A/C components resulting in $$$$ repairs. 

If in doubt, have it serviced by a professional.... familiar with Sprinters...  In the end it might seem more expensive but  failures due to inexperienced DIY jobs usually cost much more to resolve.  You don't need to necessarily go to the dealer, just make sure your tech is Sprinter qualified.  Once the issues (if any) are diagnosed, you can probably get a suitable compressor or condenser online.

This is our approach.  Your mileage and other opinions may vary.

Paul and Christine
06 View 23H TDI in NW FL, USA


David Seeds
 

Paul, thanks, not a freeze issue, I have never had condensers freeze, I have had evaporators freeze.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, 8:28 PM, bike_for_life2003 <guzowskip@...> wrote:

Dave,

Have had this happen occasionally in our 06 View... seems the condenser can freeze up in very humid weather.  It always came back after turning the A/C for a few minutes then back on. 

I have a set of A/C gauges and checked our system and all pressures were within tolerances.  Beware of fast-fix recommendations to recharge the system from a bottle of R-134 from a big-box store... Overfilling can damage many of the A/C components resulting in $$$$ repairs. 

If in doubt, have it serviced by a professional.... familiar with Sprinters...  In the end it might seem more expensive but  failures due to inexperienced DIY jobs usually cost much more to resolve.  You don't need to necessarily go to the dealer, just make sure your tech is Sprinter qualified.  Once the issues (if any) are diagnosed, you can probably get a suitable compressor or condenser online.

This is our approach.  Your mileage and other opinions may vary.

Paul and Christine
06 View 23H TDI in NW FL, USA


David Seeds
 

Eric, thanks, mine stopped working and does nothing but blow hot air, compressor pulley assembly spins whether a/c is on or off (clutch is not visible) must have a way of unloading internally. I have considered the dash control module($250). My manifold guage set has rotted hoses, new one on the way. Told Shirley Eric said hi, she didn’t answer.
Hope to see you in the Spring.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, 8:23 PM, Eric Resweber <eresweber@...> wrote:

Hey David,

 

I had a similar problem a few years back.  The dash A/C would start blowing hot air all of a sudden.  If I turned it off for 15-20 min. and then back on it would start cooling again.  Or, I could turn the temp. control down to the coldest setting and it would work.  But after a while it would get too cold so I’d have to turn it off.  Turning it up would result in hot air again.

The MB shop couldn’t replicate the problem even after 3 visits.  Finally, one other member here had the exact same symptoms.  Her shop was finally able to replicate the problem and wound up changing the entire control board--the controls on the dash.

I had to insist that my shop try this.  They didn’t want to without actually diagnosing the problem.  But I insisted.  It’s been a few years now and we haven’t had that problem since.

 

Eric & Chris

08 VB

Ps.  Hi to Cindy and Shirley

 


Doug 17 Via T
 

Based on the description of the problem, I'm not sure that the one we were experiencing is the same. However, for those who experience periodic reductions in air flow from the a/c vents, here's information from the service report after our local Mercedes shop worked on it. "Suspect evaporator has frozen up. Replaced control head with updated part per LI83.30-N-068253." It wasn't cheap, and we've not taken a long enough trip to confirm that the problem is solved, but it now appears that Mercedes knows about the issue, has produced a better controller, and has issued a service bulletin.

Doug in OR
17ViaT


Suzanne Hinds
 

We had the same problem with our AC. It turns out it needed more Freon. I don’t think they tested for any leak, but it has been running cold since they filled it a few years ago. We were also told that we need to run the AC monthly when not in use.

Suzanne 13J CA


TheS1R
 
Edited

In our class A prior to our Navion, their was a thermocouple that sensed evaporator freeze up. Ours shorted and often shut down the AC unnecessarily. The repair was replacement of the thermocouple, which was relatively inexpensive (i.e., about $60 plus labor).

Tom
16 Navion 24G 


David Seeds
 

Thanks Suzanne, I have guage and Freon on order.

On Friday, August 28, 2020, 3:11 PM, Suzanne Hinds via groups.io <sue.hinds@...> wrote:

We had the same problem with our AC. It turns out it needed more Freon. I don’t think they tested for any leak, but it has been running cold since they filled it a few years ago. We were also told that we need to run the AC monthly when not in use.

Suzanne 13J CA


Glenn Franco
 

Well after careful review?? This is hard to troubleshoot online but I would have to vote for:
#1 add 1 can of R-134A (partial charge) which is easiest enough to do and very little cost involved (less than $20 total) if you do it yourself.
#2 Sounds like the evaporator may be freezing up which in turn blocks the airflow. The AC is over achieving going down the road and there may be something missing controlling evaporator temp. That would be the evaporator temp sensor. Below is the procedure for removing and replacing. Lots of parts on the Instrument panel will have to be removed. The procedure below is right out of the Dodge Sprinter Service manual for 05.

The evaporator temperature sensor monitors the
temperature of the evaporator. The sensor will
change its internal resistance in response to the temperatures
it monitors. The ATC control module is
connected to the sensor through a sensor ground circuit
and a sensor signal circuit. As the evaporator
temperature increases, the resistance of the sensor
decreases and the voltage monitored by the module
decreases. The module uses this monitored voltage
reading to an indication of the evaporator temperature.
The ATC control module is programmed to
respond to this input by cycling the air conditioning
compressor clutch as necessary to optimize air conditioning
system performance and to protect the system
from evaporator freezing. The external location
of the sensor allows the sensor to be removed or
installed without disturbing the refrigerant in the
system. The evaporator temperature sensor is diagnosed
by performing the ATC Function Test using a
DRBIIIt scan tool. Refer to Body Diagnostic Procedures.
REMOVAL
(1) Disconnect and isolate the battery negative
cable.
(2) Remove the radio (Refer to 8 - ELECTRICAL/
AUDIO/RADIO - REMOVAL).
(3) Remove glove compartment.
(4) Remove cover from instrument cluster (Refer to
23 - BODY/INSTRUMENT PANEL/INSTRUMENT
PANEL TOP COVER - REMOVAL).
(5) Remove the instrument cluster (Refer to 8 -
ELECTRICAL/INSTRUMENT CLUSTER - REMOVAL).
(6) Remove passenger side airbag.
(7) Remove cover above air nozzle on passenger
side.
(8) Remove speaker.
(9) Remove center section of instrument panel.
(10) Remove heater-A/C control from the instrument
panel (Refer to 24 - HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING/
CONTROLS/A/C HEATER CONTROL -
REMOVAL).
(11) Remove instrument panel top section.
(12) Remove electrical connections.
(13) Remove air bezels from instrument panel.
(14) Disconnect the wire harness connector from
evaporator temperature sensor (Fig. 13).
(15) Remove evaporator temperature sensor from
heater housing.
INSTALLATION
(1) Install the new probe into the evaporator.
NOTE: The new probe must not go into the same
hole (in the evaporator core) that the old probe was
removed from.
(2) Install the wire harness connector to the evaporator
temperature sensor.
(3) Install the air bezels to the instrument panel.
(4) Install the electrical connections.
(5) Install the instrument panel top section (Refer
to 23 - BODY/INSTRUMENT PANEL/INSTRUMENT
PANEL TOP COVER - INSTALLATION).
(6) Install the heater-A/C control (Refer to 24 -
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING/CONTROLS/A/C
HEATER CONTROL - INSTALLATION).
(7) Install the center section of the instrument
panel.
(8) Install the speaker (Refer to 8 - ELECTRICAL/
AUDIO/SPEAKER - INSTALLATION).
(9) Install the cover above the air nozzle on the
passenger side.
(10) Install the passenger side airbag.
(11) Install the instrument cluster (Refer to 8 -
ELECTRICAL/INSTRUMENT CLUSTER

Good Luck
Glenn 06 Navion 23H


On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 7:05 AM David Seeds via groups.io <dw_seeds=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, thanks, not a freeze issue, I have never had condensers freeze, I have had evaporators freeze.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, 8:28 PM, bike_for_life2003 <guzowskip@...> wrote:

Dave,

Have had this happen occasionally in our 06 View... seems the condenser can freeze up in very humid weather.  It always came back after turning the A/C for a few minutes then back on. 

I have a set of A/C gauges and checked our system and all pressures were within tolerances.  Beware of fast-fix recommendations to recharge the system from a bottle of R-134 from a big-box store... Overfilling can damage many of the A/C components resulting in $$$$ repairs. 

If in doubt, have it serviced by a professional.... familiar with Sprinters...  In the end it might seem more expensive but  failures due to inexperienced DIY jobs usually cost much more to resolve.  You don't need to necessarily go to the dealer, just make sure your tech is Sprinter qualified.  Once the issues (if any) are diagnosed, you can probably get a suitable compressor or condenser online.

This is our approach.  Your mileage and other opinions may vary.

Paul and Christine
06 View 23H TDI in NW FL, USA


Glenn Franco
 

There was some discussion on using a can of R-134A as a partial charge to see if the refrigerant level might be low. Adding this would damage the AC System. 
Bear in mind this has been a repair technique that has been used on both R12 and R134A systems for years. Adding 12 or 14 ounces of refrigerant if that much actually makes it in the system will not harm the AC system. If overcharged it may lessen the effectiveness or performance but NO it will not damage the system. I and others have been doing this for years.
If you would rather spend hundreds or more take it in but in an 06 Navion I would have to say there has been refrigerant loss through the hoses and fittings and not to mention the front seal in the compressor.
Ask me how I know!
just my 2 cents worth
Glenn 06 Navion 23H 38K miles


On Sat, Aug 29, 2020 at 10:51 AM Glenn Franco via groups.io <brakey6666=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Well after careful review?? This is hard to troubleshoot online but I would have to vote for:
#1 add 1 can of R-134A (partial charge) which is easiest enough to do and very little cost involved (less than $20 total) if you do it yourself.
#2 Sounds like the evaporator may be freezing up which in turn blocks the airflow. The AC is over achieving going down the road and there may be something missing controlling evaporator temp. That would be the evaporator temp sensor. Below is the procedure for removing and replacing. Lots of parts on the Instrument panel will have to be removed. The procedure below is right out of the Dodge Sprinter Service manual for 05.

The evaporator temperature sensor monitors the
temperature of the evaporator. The sensor will
change its internal resistance in response to the temperatures
it monitors. The ATC control module is
connected to the sensor through a sensor ground circuit
and a sensor signal circuit. As the evaporator
temperature increases, the resistance of the sensor
decreases and the voltage monitored by the module
decreases. The module uses this monitored voltage
reading to an indication of the evaporator temperature.
The ATC control module is programmed to
respond to this input by cycling the air conditioning
compressor clutch as necessary to optimize air conditioning
system performance and to protect the system
from evaporator freezing. The external location
of the sensor allows the sensor to be removed or
installed without disturbing the refrigerant in the
system. The evaporator temperature sensor is diagnosed
by performing the ATC Function Test using a
DRBIIIt scan tool. Refer to Body Diagnostic Procedures.
REMOVAL
(1) Disconnect and isolate the battery negative
cable.
(2) Remove the radio (Refer to 8 - ELECTRICAL/
AUDIO/RADIO - REMOVAL).
(3) Remove glove compartment.
(4) Remove cover from instrument cluster (Refer to
23 - BODY/INSTRUMENT PANEL/INSTRUMENT
PANEL TOP COVER - REMOVAL).
(5) Remove the instrument cluster (Refer to 8 -
ELECTRICAL/INSTRUMENT CLUSTER - REMOVAL).
(6) Remove passenger side airbag.
(7) Remove cover above air nozzle on passenger
side.
(8) Remove speaker.
(9) Remove center section of instrument panel.
(10) Remove heater-A/C control from the instrument
panel (Refer to 24 - HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING/
CONTROLS/A/C HEATER CONTROL -
REMOVAL).
(11) Remove instrument panel top section.
(12) Remove electrical connections.
(13) Remove air bezels from instrument panel.
(14) Disconnect the wire harness connector from
evaporator temperature sensor (Fig. 13).
(15) Remove evaporator temperature sensor from
heater housing.
INSTALLATION
(1) Install the new probe into the evaporator.
NOTE: The new probe must not go into the same
hole (in the evaporator core) that the old probe was
removed from.
(2) Install the wire harness connector to the evaporator
temperature sensor.
(3) Install the air bezels to the instrument panel.
(4) Install the electrical connections.
(5) Install the instrument panel top section (Refer
to 23 - BODY/INSTRUMENT PANEL/INSTRUMENT
PANEL TOP COVER - INSTALLATION).
(6) Install the heater-A/C control (Refer to 24 -
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING/CONTROLS/A/C
HEATER CONTROL - INSTALLATION).
(7) Install the center section of the instrument
panel.
(8) Install the speaker (Refer to 8 - ELECTRICAL/
AUDIO/SPEAKER - INSTALLATION).
(9) Install the cover above the air nozzle on the
passenger side.
(10) Install the passenger side airbag.
(11) Install the instrument cluster (Refer to 8 -
ELECTRICAL/INSTRUMENT CLUSTER

Good Luck
Glenn 06 Navion 23H

On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 7:05 AM David Seeds via groups.io <dw_seeds=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, thanks, not a freeze issue, I have never had condensers freeze, I have had evaporators freeze.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, 8:28 PM, bike_for_life2003 <guzowskip@...> wrote:

Dave,

Have had this happen occasionally in our 06 View... seems the condenser can freeze up in very humid weather.  It always came back after turning the A/C for a few minutes then back on. 

I have a set of A/C gauges and checked our system and all pressures were within tolerances.  Beware of fast-fix recommendations to recharge the system from a bottle of R-134 from a big-box store... Overfilling can damage many of the A/C components resulting in $$$$ repairs. 

If in doubt, have it serviced by a professional.... familiar with Sprinters...  In the end it might seem more expensive but  failures due to inexperienced DIY jobs usually cost much more to resolve.  You don't need to necessarily go to the dealer, just make sure your tech is Sprinter qualified.  Once the issues (if any) are diagnosed, you can probably get a suitable compressor or condenser online.

This is our approach.  Your mileage and other opinions may vary.

Paul and Christine
06 View 23H TDI in NW FL, USA


David Seeds
 

Glen, thanks again for info., I too have used R12 and 134a to add refrigerant and in one instant in 1972 refill a dash A/C hang on unit I removed from a junked car. For my 2015 Sprinter which you recall is only blowing hot air I have ordered a 20 oz. can with a pressure guage attached. Guage will eliminate over charging.
“Don’t try this at home”.  Please, this can be dangerous i.e. frozen fingers or eye! Pressures can approach 300 psi.