Topics

Factory install of minisplit heatpump


Keith Taylor
 

I have contacted several minisplit manufactures to start a conversation on installing cassette minisplit heat pumps both retrofit and from the factory. 
Pioneer has followed through with sizibg and sketches for a retrofit for my 25 foot motorhome.
Minisplits are quiet, energy efficient and far superior to conventional across the line start RV AC units.
Please respond and I will forward to Pioneer.
Pioneers very interested if they can invest100,000 yto get engineering and UL approval...and have asked if there is a one thousand unit per year sales possibility.

Just think...no blonking power dips on start up...no loud valve shifts to equalize AC pressure...energy efficient etc etc.

Thank you to all the trailer. 5th wheel, motorhome  and converted van RV folks.

Keith


Bob
 

Another aspect is lower roof profile. The mini split compressor condenser unit could be bottom / basement storage mounted. This would also provide some sound limiting and eliminate roof vibration. Love the idea!

Bob.

On Sep 9, 2020, at 12:11 PM, Keith Taylor <srtaylor2@...> wrote:

I have contacted several minisplit manufactures to start a conversation on installing cassette minisplit heat pumps both retrofit and from the factory. 
Pioneer has followed through with sizibg and sketches for a retrofit for my 25 foot motorhome.
Minisplits are quiet, energy efficient and far superior to conventional across the line start RV AC units.
Please respond and I will forward to Pioneer.
Pioneers very interested if they can invest100,000 yto get engineering and UL approval...and have asked if there is a one thousand unit per year sales possibility.

Just think...no blonking power dips on start up...no loud valve shifts to equalize AC pressure...energy efficient etc etc.

Thank you to all the trailer. 5th wheel, motorhome  and converted van RV folks.

Keith


Peter B. Masley
 

Definitely Interested in a mini split.

Peter
2010 Navion J
Alabama


old_b4_my_time
 

I was really excited thinking about a mini-split for a while and then I tried to put on my "reality check hat" and I came up with too many negatives.   About the only thing that would drive me to do this is what I believe are "highly inflated claims" of people with gigantic lithium battery banks who claim they are able to power these and use them all the time off battery power.   I just don't see how this can happen in such a leaky coach as this one, heat-wise.   Of course I see how maybe a lithium battery setup and small AC unit could work on many of these homemade or custom made campers that appear more like a reefer-truck boxes with the couple of tiny windows in the reefer-style box that's anchored on the truck bed.    There's just too much energy lost in most conventional RVs to believe a battery powered AC is practical.  All these people on youtube who claim they are utilizing them, even with their thousands invested in lithium, they always seem to be living in climates where they believe high 80's is reason enough to fire up the AC.  (Never think about one under 90, as if I want to box myself in a room and read, I'll stay home.)   

There's also no talk of the charging ritual and what that involves.   I'm betting not too many hours of AC use is going to come out of the amount of solar panels we can fit on our vehicles.    In the instance of claiming a solar panel array can power the energy required to cool these vehicles, particularly on a small coach such as ours the idea that such a system can run off the sun is pretty preposterous and these large lithium banks are mostly using solar panels for a simple "green cover" to hide the fact that still a vast transfer of petroleum energy must occur, converting and storing it as chemical energy in a battery bank.   The same vast "energy suck" that goes on from converting petroleum energy into lithium cells still has to occur in the absence of grid power so in this case they may as well add another compressor to the engine and just idle it all the time.

With an install of a mini-split on my coach I'd also be thinking about something else to fear might fall off the back going over a stiff bump, or backing into something or if something like a compressor/condensor just outside the rear window wouldn't also be noisy.   I'd also be worried that a single source of "coolness" right above the bed (where most people mount them) would thus keep only the area right above the bed cool and the rest of the coach progressively warmer (compared to using the differently flawed top unit).   As I continue to experience mini-splits in hotels (always say "oh crap" when I find one right above the bed in a hotel) it usually means lack of much louver control or one of those "turkey baster" moving louver systems and that always seem to blow ice cold air up and down my body in painted waves of pain.   I can't count how many times I've used twine and hotel towels to build "mini sails" in a hotel room to keep the air from blowing directly on me and when it is too hot and stuffy just to shut it off.

During a recent summer where I didn't have 30A or enough to power the top AC unit, while i was parked for 6 months I tried a 12000 BTU window unit hung in the dining room slide-out window of a J-Model.    While I found it would keep the area around the dining table frosty cold (during a Texas Summer) and when I measured 72-74 in that area, the best the bed would cool down to is 85.   I finally set a portable fan on the table to blow back to the bed that lowered it down to about 78 which with another fan back in the back I was able to tolerate it, but the short story here is as horribly bad as this coach is insulated, it really takes something like the make-shift vented system they've devised for us with the factory installed top AC units to keep it near evenly cool.   Even that roaring rooftop beast is not enough I have found in a 107F Texas summer and with no shade outside, about 85F inside is  as low as to be expected with 100% duty cycle.

So unless you want to change your whole traveling lifestyle and go with one of these giant refrigeration-truck-like vehicles that the "overlanders" use where they live in a near windowless big box of insulation and are actually able to keep their living quarters cool or warm with a relative small energy consuming device, as long as you require the luxury of a conventional style RV with lots of light and windows, the almost zero insulation factor will have heat leaking back inside as fast as the AC can work to pull it out during summer and the heat from your heater or furnace leaking outside faster than the heater can replace it in winter.

Only solution unless coaches change to a point in the future of doubling insulation, using dual pane windows, etc and without this if you want to stay comfortable then the only solution seems to be - drive only where the weather is nice.
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Jeffrey M Jacques
 

Me, too. As our units age,?it’s nice to have modern options. 

jeff & Marla
2010 N J 140K miles
South FL

On Sep 9, 2020, at 1:20 PM, old_b4_my_time <donphillipe@...> wrote:

I was really excited thinking about a mini-split for a while and then I tried to put on my "reality check hat" and I came up with too many negatives.   About the only thing that would drive me to do this is what I believe are "highly inflated claims" of people with gigantic lithium battery banks who claim they are able to power these and use them all the time off battery power.   I just don't see how this can happen in such a leaky coach as this one, heat-wise.   Of course I see how maybe a lithium battery setup and small AC unit could work on many of these homemade or custom made campers that appear more like a reefer-truck boxes with the couple of tiny windows in the reefer-style box that's anchored on the truck bed.    There's just too much energy lost in most conventional RVs to believe a battery powered AC is practical.  All these people on youtube who claim they are utilizing them, even with their thousands invested in lithium, they always seem to be living in climates where they believe high 80's is reason enough to fire up the AC.  (Never think about one under 90, as if I want to box myself in a room and read, I'll stay home.)   

There's also no talk of the charging ritual and what that involves.   I'm betting not too many hours of AC use is going to come out of the amount of solar panels we can fit on our vehicles.    In the instance of claiming a solar panel array can power the energy required to cool these vehicles, particularly on a small coach such as ours the idea that such a system can run off the sun is pretty preposterous and these large lithium banks are mostly using solar panels for a simple "green cover" to hide the fact that still a vast transfer of petroleum energy must occur, converting and storing it as chemical energy in a battery bank.   The same vast "energy suck" that goes on from converting petroleum energy into lithium cells still has to occur in the absence of grid power so in this case they may as well add another compressor to the engine and just idle it all the time.

With an install of a mini-split on my coach I'd also be thinking about something else to fear might fall off the back going over a stiff bump, or backing into something or if something like a compressor/condensor just outside the rear window wouldn't also be noisy.   I'd also be worried that a single source of "coolness" right above the bed (where most people mount them) would thus keep only the area right above the bed cool and the rest of the coach progressively warmer (compared to using the differently flawed top unit).   As I continue to experience mini-splits in hotels (always say "oh crap" when I find one right above the bed in a hotel) it usually means lack of much louver control or one of those "turkey baster" moving louver systems and that always seem to blow ice cold air up and down my body in painted waves of pain.   I can't count how many times I've used twine and hotel towels to build "mini sails" in a hotel room to keep the air from blowing directly on me and when it is too hot and stuffy just to shut it off.

During a recent summer where I didn't have 30A or enough to power the top AC unit, while i was parked for 6 months I tried a 12000 BTU window unit hung in the dining room slide-out window of a J-Model.    While I found it would keep the area around the dining table frosty cold (during a Texas Summer) and when I measured 72-74 in that area, the best the bed would cool down to is 85.   I finally set a portable fan on the table to blow back to the bed that lowered it down to about 78 which with another fan back in the back I was able to tolerate it, but the short story here is as horribly bad as this coach is insulated, it really takes something like the make-shift vented system they've devised for us with the factory installed top AC units to keep it near evenly cool.   Even that roaring rooftop beast is not enough I have found in a 107F Texas summer and with no shade outside, about 85F inside is  as low as to be expected with 100% duty cycle.

So unless you want to change your whole traveling lifestyle and go with one of these giant refrigeration-truck-like vehicles that the "overlanders" use where they live in a near windowless big box of insulation and are actually able to keep their living quarters cool or warm with a relative small energy consuming device, as long as you require the luxury of a conventional style RV with lots of light and windows, the almost zero insulation factor will have heat leaking back inside as fast as the AC can work to pull it out during summer and the heat from your heater or furnace leaking outside faster than the heater can replace it in winter.

Only solution unless coaches change to a point in the future of doubling insulation, using dual pane windows, etc and without this if you want to stay comfortable then the only solution seems to be - drive only where the weather is nice.
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Craig Edwards
 

Minisplit technology is a great fit for RVs, and there are many examples of folks adapting existing mini-split units for MH or even trailer use. Not sure what packaging options Pioneer are considering, but I would supply them the RV numbers in use as the TAM and then let them make their assumptions from there.  My guess would be that 1000 per year should be easy with just closing a couple of OEM accounts…. I would think 5 to 10K per year would doable if they come out with a really innovative and easy to adapt package.  As you probably know  Coleman used to offer a split system with the compressor in the “basement”,  but ultimately was discontinued.  I don’t know why… (I would speculate cost vs. a single packaged roof unit).  If their design was available with the latest variable speed compressor technology it would seem to offer a lot of advantages.  From my experience with the basement units the main advantages were nothing on roof and quieter operation when inside the rig.  Some didn’t like the access issues of the basement compressor, but I think that was rig dependent.   In the end there are lots of tradeoffs, I would expect to see modern variable flow technology to show up in the roof single package units before too long… I’m sure it’s just a matter of cost.   That would solve the startup issues, and of course the efficiency issues are a matter of the sizes of the condenser and evaporator coils, insulation, etc.   It does seem like the RV AC manufacturers have been pretty slow to embrace the newer technology.  

 

 

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Taylor via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2020 9:11 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: [view-naviontech] Factory install of minisplit heatpump

 

I have contacted several minisplit manufactures to start a conversation on installing cassette minisplit heat pumps both retrofit and from the factory. 
Pioneer has followed through with sizibg and sketches for a retrofit for my 25 foot motorhome.
Minisplits are quiet, energy efficient and far superior to conventional across the line start RV AC units.
Please respond and I will forward to Pioneer.
Pioneers very interested if they can invest100,000 yto get engineering and UL approval...and have asked if there is a one thousand unit per year sales possibility.

Just think...no blonking power dips on start up...no loud valve shifts to equalize AC pressure...energy efficient etc etc.

Thank you to all the trailer. 5th wheel, motorhome  and converted van RV folks.

Keith


old_b4_my_time
 

Still it seems that everyone bent on mini-splits is ignoring what it took 30 years to come up with, and that's a multi-vented roof top solution that Winnebago produced to distribute the cold air from the old standard Coleman rooftop unit, and distributing that fairly evenly around a very poorly insulated coach.   Unless these mini-splits have a rooftop unit that feeds into the existing duct work, I wouldn't be interested..  I'd hate to go back to the early 80's solution which was a single unit blowing down in the center of the coach and even more-so if that meant the source was a mini-split head unit right above my bed doing the same.    I think one would experience a very limited scope of comfort going to a single port of cooling and that would be a serious step backward in my book to abandon the current duct-work architecture.
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Matt Praz
 

Ok here is a life time of HVAC experience speaking. I doubt the RV industry will ever embrace a split system simply because of the issues and skills required to install it. Mini splits are great, have some potential as many are DC based, but the people that build and service these rigs are several notches below what to takes to make these things work. The RV industry want a simple drop in package that’s plug and play and not an erector set that requires weighing in a precise charge. I’ve been all around the industry and never heard of Pioneer, but also know there are many low cost, and “Cheap” mini split system from Asia that are distributed by here today gone tomorrow companies. Can’t tell the number of times had to tell a client that the great deal they got a year or two ago has to be replaced because parts are not available and that warranty they have is worthless. I’d be more incline to find some one who wants to challenge Dometic/Coleman and build a DC unit that sits in the same foot print of the existing units. But right now it is lowest installed cost as energy/operating costs are not an issue for campers as it is included in the camp site fee and spread around to everyone. Yes I could engineer, install and maintain one of these system, but the juice is not worth the squeeze, and I’d be cursed by the person who got my retired RV when they attempted to service it. JMHO

 

Matthew R Prazenka

mattprazen@... 

847-790-4348

http://www.linkedin.com/in/mattprazenka

 

View my profile on LinkedIn

 

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Craig Edwards
Sent: Wednesday, September 9, 2020 2:33 PM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] Factory install of minisplit heatpump

 

Minisplit technology is a great fit for RVs, and there are many examples of folks adapting existing mini-split units for MH or even trailer use. Not sure what packaging options Pioneer are considering, but I would supply them the RV numbers in use as the TAM and then let them make their assumptions from there.  My guess would be that 1000 per year should be easy with just closing a couple of OEM accounts…. I would think 5 to 10K per year would doable if they come out with a really innovative and easy to adapt package.  As you probably know  Coleman used to offer a split system with the compressor in the “basement”,  but ultimately was discontinued.  I don’t know why… (I would speculate cost vs. a single packaged roof unit).  If their design was available with the latest variable speed compressor technology it would seem to offer a lot of advantages.  From my experience with the basement units the main advantages were nothing on roof and quieter operation when inside the rig.  Some didn’t like the access issues of the basement compressor, but I think that was rig dependent.   In the end there are lots of tradeoffs, I would expect to see modern variable flow technology to show up in the roof single package units before too long… I’m sure it’s just a matter of cost.   That would solve the startup issues, and of course the efficiency issues are a matter of the sizes of the condenser and evaporator coils, insulation, etc.   It does seem like the RV AC manufacturers have been pretty slow to embrace the newer technology.  

 

 

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Taylor via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2020 9:11 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: [view-naviontech] Factory install of minisplit heatpump

 

I have contacted several minisplit manufactures to start a conversation on installing cassette minisplit heat pumps both retrofit and from the factory. 
Pioneer has followed through with sizibg and sketches for a retrofit for my 25 foot motorhome.
Minisplits are quiet, energy efficient and far superior to conventional across the line start RV AC units.
Please respond and I will forward to Pioneer.
Pioneers very interested if they can invest100,000 yto get engineering and UL approval...and have asked if there is a one thousand unit per year sales possibility.

Just think...no blonking power dips on start up...no loud valve shifts to equalize AC pressure...energy efficient etc etc.

Thank you to all the trailer. 5th wheel, motorhome  and converted van RV folks.

Keith


Keith Taylor
 

1. The mini split have precharged line sets.
Any hillbilly can install a mini split.
2. When a conventional RV AC goes out you toss it...mute point comparing cheap China mini splits.
3. RV techs cost $165 per hour and AC Techs are 85 per hour.
4. Any AC tech with a scale, A set of gages, a multi meter and some R410 can fix any mini split.
Good idea to get Coleman or Dometic to develop a drop in place inverter mini split.

We need to move on to technology not stay stuck in status quo.

Keith


On Thu, Sep 10, 2020, 11:32 AM Matt Praz <mattprazen@...> wrote:

Ok here is a life time of HVAC experience speaking. I doubt the RV industry will ever embrace a split system simply because of the issues and skills required to install it. Mini splits are great, have some potential as many are DC based, but the people that build and service these rigs are several notches below what to takes to make these things work. The RV industry want a simple drop in package that’s plug and play and not an erector set that requires weighing in a precise charge. I’ve been all around the industry and never heard of Pioneer, but also know there are many low cost, and “Cheap” mini split system from Asia that are distributed by here today gone tomorrow companies. Can’t tell the number of times had to tell a client that the great deal they got a year or two ago has to be replaced because parts are not available and that warranty they have is worthless. I’d be more incline to find some one who wants to challenge Dometic/Coleman and build a DC unit that sits in the same foot print of the existing units. But right now it is lowest installed cost as energy/operating costs are not an issue for campers as it is included in the camp site fee and spread around to everyone. Yes I could engineer, install and maintain one of these system, but the juice is not worth the squeeze, and I’d be cursed by the person who got my retired RV when they attempted to service it. JMHO

 

Matthew R Prazenka

mattprazen@... 

847-790-4348

http://www.linkedin.com/in/mattprazenka

 

 

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Craig Edwards
Sent: Wednesday, September 9, 2020 2:33 PM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] Factory install of minisplit heatpump

 

Minisplit technology is a great fit for RVs, and there are many examples of folks adapting existing mini-split units for MH or even trailer use. Not sure what packaging options Pioneer are considering, but I would supply them the RV numbers in use as the TAM and then let them make their assumptions from there.  My guess would be that 1000 per year should be easy with just closing a couple of OEM accounts…. I would think 5 to 10K per year would doable if they come out with a really innovative and easy to adapt package.  As you probably know  Coleman used to offer a split system with the compressor in the “basement”,  but ultimately was discontinued.  I don’t know why… (I would speculate cost vs. a single packaged roof unit).  If their design was available with the latest variable speed compressor technology it would seem to offer a lot of advantages.  From my experience with the basement units the main advantages were nothing on roof and quieter operation when inside the rig.  Some didn’t like the access issues of the basement compressor, but I think that was rig dependent.   In the end there are lots of tradeoffs, I would expect to see modern variable flow technology to show up in the roof single package units before too long… I’m sure it’s just a matter of cost.   That would solve the startup issues, and of course the efficiency issues are a matter of the sizes of the condenser and evaporator coils, insulation, etc.   It does seem like the RV AC manufacturers have been pretty slow to embrace the newer technology.  

 

 

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Taylor via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2020 9:11 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: [view-naviontech] Factory install of minisplit heatpump

 

I have contacted several minisplit manufactures to start a conversation on installing cassette minisplit heat pumps both retrofit and from the factory. 
Pioneer has followed through with sizibg and sketches for a retrofit for my 25 foot motorhome.
Minisplits are quiet, energy efficient and far superior to conventional across the line start RV AC units.
Please respond and I will forward to Pioneer.
Pioneers very interested if they can invest100,000 yto get engineering and UL approval...and have asked if there is a one thousand unit per year sales possibility.

Just think...no blonking power dips on start up...no loud valve shifts to equalize AC pressure...energy efficient etc etc.

Thank you to all the trailer. 5th wheel, motorhome  and converted van RV folks.

Keith


Matt Praz
 

Got to say Keith you have all the answers, while they are wrong, if you believe them I suggest you solicit some seed money and built the answer and sell it to a manufacturer. You’ll be rich!  I’ve installed mini splits, many of them. I currently recruit for the HVAC Industry and have contacts across the country so I’m not a stranger to this. I’ve design and install many specialty systems for specific applications. I concur there is an opportunity here, but’s let do it right, just not another hack. One the things you failed to address is the leverage of the DC system within many better mini splits. The inverter loss going from DC to AC  and having the Air Conditioner convert it back to a DC is a loss of 20-40% of energy. If corrected would allow for self sustaining off grid use. However your $85/hr Hillbilly with a scale, gauges, and tail light warranty is not the guy who is going to it done. 
All the best

Matt Praz 


On Wed, Sep 30, 2020 at 7:00 PM Keith Taylor <srtaylor2@...> wrote:
1. The mini split have precharged line sets.
Any hillbilly can install a mini split.
2. When a conventional RV AC goes out you toss it...mute point comparing cheap China mini splits.
3. RV techs cost $165 per hour and AC Techs are 85 per hour.
4. Any AC tech with a scale, A set of gages, a multi meter and some R410 can fix any mini split.
Good idea to get Coleman or Dometic to develop a drop in place inverter mini split.

We need to move on to technology not stay stuck in status quo.

Keith

On Thu, Sep 10, 2020, 11:32 AM Matt Praz <mattprazen@...> wrote:

Ok here is a life time of HVAC experience speaking. I doubt the RV industry will ever embrace a split system simply because of the issues and skills required to install it. Mini splits are great, have some potential as many are DC based, but the people that build and service these rigs are several notches below what to takes to make these things work. The RV industry want a simple drop in package that’s plug and play and not an erector set that requires weighing in a precise charge. I’ve been all around the industry and never heard of Pioneer, but also know there are many low cost, and “Cheap” mini split system from Asia that are distributed by here today gone tomorrow companies. Can’t tell the number of times had to tell a client that the great deal they got a year or two ago has to be replaced because parts are not available and that warranty they have is worthless. I’d be more incline to find some one who wants to challenge Dometic/Coleman and build a DC unit that sits in the same foot print of the existing units. But right now it is lowest installed cost as energy/operating costs are not an issue for campers as it is included in the camp site fee and spread around to everyone. Yes I could engineer, install and maintain one of these system, but the juice is not worth the squeeze, and I’d be cursed by the person who got my retired RV when they attempted to service it. JMHO

 

Matthew R Prazenka

mattprazen@... 

847-790-4348

http://www.linkedin.com/in/mattprazenka

 

View my profile on LinkedIn

 

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Craig Edwards
Sent: Wednesday, September 9, 2020 2:33 PM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] Factory install of minisplit heatpump

 

Minisplit technology is a great fit for RVs, and there are many examples of folks adapting existing mini-split units for MH or even trailer use. Not sure what packaging options Pioneer are considering, but I would supply them the RV numbers in use as the TAM and then let them make their assumptions from there.  My guess would be that 1000 per year should be easy with just closing a couple of OEM accounts…. I would think 5 to 10K per year would doable if they come out with a really innovative and easy to adapt package.  As you probably know  Coleman used to offer a split system with the compressor in the “basement”,  but ultimately was discontinued.  I don’t know why… (I would speculate cost vs. a single packaged roof unit).  If their design was available with the latest variable speed compressor technology it would seem to offer a lot of advantages.  From my experience with the basement units the main advantages were nothing on roof and quieter operation when inside the rig.  Some didn’t like the access issues of the basement compressor, but I think that was rig dependent.   In the end there are lots of tradeoffs, I would expect to see modern variable flow technology to show up in the roof single package units before too long… I’m sure it’s just a matter of cost.   That would solve the startup issues, and of course the efficiency issues are a matter of the sizes of the condenser and evaporator coils, insulation, etc.   It does seem like the RV AC manufacturers have been pretty slow to embrace the newer technology.  

 

 

 

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Taylor via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, September 09, 2020 9:11 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: [view-naviontech] Factory install of minisplit heatpump

 

I have contacted several minisplit manufactures to start a conversation on installing cassette minisplit heat pumps both retrofit and from the factory. 
Pioneer has followed through with sizibg and sketches for a retrofit for my 25 foot motorhome.
Minisplits are quiet, energy efficient and far superior to conventional across the line start RV AC units.
Please respond and I will forward to Pioneer.
Pioneers very interested if they can invest100,000 yto get engineering and UL approval...and have asked if there is a one thousand unit per year sales possibility.

Just think...no blonking power dips on start up...no loud valve shifts to equalize AC pressure...energy efficient etc etc.

Thank you to all the trailer. 5th wheel, motorhome  and converted van RV folks.

Keith



















--
Matthew Prazenka
mattprazen@...