Topics

"mission critical" spare parts


Dick Stevenson
 

Hi all,

Has anyone ever generated what I call a “mission critical” list of spare parts? I am thinking of the recently mentioned thermistor, a domestic water pump, a serpentine belt, propane solenoid and the like. Things that stop you, but, if you had the spare part ready-at-hand, you could readily fix (or have fixed) and be on your way. If the part is not easily available, your wandering might be stalled in some un-appealing place for days or longer.

If really ambitious we could peg the list to the various vehicles and years (or leave that to individuals to sort out for themselves) and note any unusual tools or procedures to execute the repairs.

Random thoughts, Dick Stevenson   


Glenn Franco
 

I was thinking the same thing although I would probably need to haul a trailer behind me.
To start off a list I bring:
- 2 battery trickle chargers
- Spare new starter
- Spare fuse box #1
- Spare starter relay
- Spare fuse assortment
- Spare new fuel filter
- Spare new Serpentine Belt
- My OTC OBDII Diagnostic tool
- WD 40 or equivalent
- A full set of hand tools in a big tool bag.

I have an alternator pulley and glow plugs on order that I will likely bring along.
I'm replacing all (bizzion of them) my coolant hoses and will likely bring some of the better ones along.

You can usually source RV related stuff on the road.
I had the fridge circuit board go bad in my bounder and found a replacement in the next town but that was central PA.

Anything I should add to the list?

Glenn 2006 Navion 23H 38k mi


On Thu, Sep 17, 2020 at 9:44 AM Dick Stevenson <alchemy128@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Has anyone ever generated what I call a “mission critical” list of spare parts? I am thinking of the recently mentioned thermistor, a domestic water pump, a serpentine belt, propane solenoid and the like. Things that stop you, but, if you had the spare part ready-at-hand, you could readily fix (or have fixed) and be on your way. If the part is not easily available, your wandering might be stalled in some un-appealing place for days or longer.

If really ambitious we could peg the list to the various vehicles and years (or leave that to individuals to sort out for themselves) and note any unusual tools or procedures to execute the repairs.

Random thoughts, Dick Stevenson   


waydigs
 

Yes Glenn, you better find a utility trailer.  You are talking about some serious weight and some serious space requirements.

Most of my travels during my "younger days" was in a Holiday Rambler and you could find almost everything you mention at a Cummins truck repair facility close to you.

I put over 100 K miles on two class A's and the only thing I ever took along with me was a spare serpentine belt and a set of fuel filters.

I would have had to carry three different slide motors if I wanted to have avoided the breakdowns THAT  DID  sideline me for a few days, but other than that,  I never was down for more than a day.

However, to each his  own and I am envious of your ability to change parts (and have the parts)  as necessary.  You are a lucky man.!
Me, I am too old...Just Call AAA and sit  and wait !!
Wayne
'16 V" mod.



Dick Stevenson
 

Hi Glenn and all,

Clearly, a list must reflect the skills of the owner and, I also envy the implied skills from your list.

I would suggest considering a water pump, the thermistor mentioned earlier, did you remember the inverter fuse, a CNN 150 if memory serves on my rig. Maybe also a solenoid for the propane. These are small items that could be hard to source (at least with the same footprint), but if they went bad, could ruin one’s day.

Do you carry the filters to change fluids yourself or to have MB filters so others can do the work and not have to worry about parts sourcing?

My best, Dick Stevenson

 


Richard Filcoff
 

Propane regulator

Headlight, taillight & brake light bulbs

Rick Filcoff

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dick Stevenson
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2020 2:32 PM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] "mission critical" spare parts

 

Hi Glenn and all,

Clearly, a list must reflect the skills of the owner and, I also envy the implied skills from your list.

I would suggest considering a water pump, the thermistor mentioned earlier, did you remember the inverter fuse, a CNN 150 if memory serves on my rig. Maybe also a solenoid for the propane. These are small items that could be hard to source (at least with the same footprint), but if they went bad, could ruin one’s day.

Do you carry the filters to change fluids yourself or to have MB filters so others can do the work and not have to worry about parts sourcing?

My best, Dick Stevenson

 


Dick Stevenson
 

Hi Rick,
Can mere mortals even get to the bulbs these days? Dick


Glenn Franco
 

Yes I do all the work myself. A waterpump is a pretty involved on the road repair, not sure if I would do it in a campsite or on the side of the freeway.

I use various parts suppliers. My last choice is the Autozones and O'reilly's (inexperienced counter help) . I generally use, if I can find one, Carquest that hasn't gone to Advance Auto name yet. I use Amazon Prime quite a bit since if the part is incorrect it can be returned within 30 days. Last resort is Ebay or the Dealer if I just can't find it.

I plead ignorance on the thermistor, where is it used? Also the inverter fuse??

Glenn 06 23H


On Fri, Sep 18, 2020 at 6:56 AM Dick Stevenson <alchemy128@...> wrote:
Hi Rick,
Can mere mortals even get to the bulbs these days? Dick


Dick Stevenson
 

As I understand it the thermistor is on the cooling fins to regulate frig temps. On my 2016 view the fuse is in the battery box and with its 150a rating I assumed without tracking wire that it was the inverter. Pecking this out on the phone. More to follow. Dick


Glenn Franco
 

OK I'm very familiar with the thermistor in the fridge. I tested ours this past trip when we thought we had a problem with it but instead it was New Very Dead Coach Batteries that would not take a charge.

On Fri, Sep 18, 2020 at 8:50 AM Dick Stevenson <alchemy128@...> wrote:
As I understand it the thermistor is on the cooling fins to regulate frig temps. On my 2016 view the fuse is in the battery box and with its 150a rating I assumed without tracking wire that it was the inverter. Pecking this out on the phone. More to follow. Dick


old_b4_my_time
 

A set of both e-torx sockets and torx bits on 3/8" drive for your tool bag...... These could come in handy like they did for me driving in a remote location when the alternator went out.   While the shop could fix an alternator, they did not have any torx wrenches on hand and could not have removed the alternator without them.   I shared with the mechanic and he was very grateful as was I that they were on board.

Other passing thoughts ....
- fold out triangles and florescent safety vest
- window squeegee and ice scraper
- towels & window cleaner
- spare boost relay (solenoid)  if you use conventional batteries
- spare keys (the more the better and hide one door key under vehicle frame if you can find a secure spot)
- white flag for antenna (if you travel in non-cell coverage areas)
- flashlights and back-up flashlights
- batteries for flashlights and remote controls and extra battery button for key door unlock dongle
- duct and electrical tape and scotch tape and thumb tacks (for notes on offices and notices and receipts on your vehicle)
- light tarp if you are willing to slide under the vehicle to make minor repairs
- blankets and heavy clothing if traveling in cold climates for furnace-failure situation
- first aid kit
- non-perishable foods for a break-down day (failed refrigerator or held up at a repair shop)
- fold up water bags to tote-in water
- 100' flat collapsing roll-able vinyl hose
- high pressure regulator, y-connector and hand spray attachment
- bungees, small roll of soft dog fence wire & stiffer bailing wire for tying up anything that comes loose
- various rope sizes and blind cord if you have the sliding type "friction bound by cord" style folding accordion shades
- various flare-it end to 1/2" pipe pieces and shut off valves
- ant poison (liquid & granule), bug spray, mosquito repellent and mice bait stuffed inside hollow supporting under-rails

In my tool bag and parts bin I also carry:
- scan gauge for engine diagnostics
- multi-meter (if you know how to use it)
- multi-meter (to check campground voltages if you don't have surge protector)
- full set of mini-screwdrivers (phone repair, small electronics, glasses, etc.)
- set of flat head/ Phillips screw drivers including a full bit drive set with flat-head, Phillips, torx, safety torx, hex bit set
- 1/4" socket set, ratchet, break-over bar, 12", 6", 1" extensions and screw-bit attachment
- same as above in 3/8"
- 1/2" break-over bar and 12" extension with socket to fit tire lugs
- e-torx and torx bit set (as described in first paragraph)
- pliers, vice grips (sm & lg), 3 size of crescents, channel locks, long nosed and diagonal cutters (sm & lg)
- 90 degree full range hex key set
- sharp pocket knife, small and medium file, and emery cloth
- cordless drill & charger & bit set and screw bit adapter
- crimp tool and 3 sizes of wire couplers (red, blue, yellow)
- small roll of blk/red 12AWG & 18AWG hook up wire
- soldering iron, miniature heat gun, solder and heat shrink
- bag of stainless screws various sizes
- small assortment of cabin replacement LEDs, plus running lamps, stop and parking, single headlamp

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Richard Filcoff
 

Don,

Very nice list.

Adding:

moving pad ($5 from Harbor Freight) to lay on when working under RV.

Headlamp with spare batteries (Li ion type preferred due to brightness & run time)

Gorilla Tape black (optional, also clear)

Alcohol (70% IPA) for cleaning  (small bottle)

Paint thinner/mineral spirits for cleaning (small bottle)

Safety glasses

Goes without say, but better have a good first aid kit handy if you plan to be working on vehicle.  Especially need eyewash.

Rick Filcoff

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of old_b4_my_time
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2020 11:37 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] "mission critical" spare parts

 

A set of both e-torx sockets and torx bits on 3/8" drive for your tool bag...... These could come in handy like they did for me driving in a remote location when the alternator went out.   While the shop could fix an alternator, they did not have any torx wrenches on hand and could not have removed the alternator without them.   I shared with the mechanic and he was very grateful as was I that they were on board.

Other passing thoughts ....
- fold out triangles and florescent safety vest
- window squeegee and ice scraper
- towels & window cleaner
- spare boost relay (solenoid)  if you use conventional batteries
- spare keys (the more the better and hide one door key under vehicle frame if you can find a secure spot)
- white flag for antenna (if you travel in non-cell coverage areas)
- flashlights and back-up flashlights
- batteries for flashlights and remote controls and extra battery button for key door unlock dongle
- duct and electrical tape and scotch tape and thumb tacks (for notes on offices and notices and receipts on your vehicle)
- light tarp if you are willing to slide under the vehicle to make minor repairs
- blankets and heavy clothing if traveling in cold climates for furnace-failure situation
- first aid kit
- non-perishable foods for a break-down day (failed refrigerator or held up at a repair shop)
- fold up water bags to tote-in water
- 100' flat collapsing roll-able vinyl hose
- high pressure regulator, y-connector and hand spray attachment
- bungees, small roll of soft dog fence wire & stiffer bailing wire for tying up anything that comes loose
- various rope sizes and blind cord if you have the sliding type "friction bound by cord" style folding accordion shades
- various flare-it end to 1/2" pipe pieces and shut off valves
- ant poison (liquid & granule), bug spray, mosquito repellent and mice bait stuffed inside hollow supporting under-rails

In my tool bag and parts bin I also carry:
- scan gauge for engine diagnostics
- multi-meter (if you know how to use it)
- multi-meter (to check campground voltages if you don't have surge protector)
- full set of mini-screwdrivers (phone repair, small electronics, glasses, etc.)
- set of flat head/ Phillips screw drivers including a full bit drive set with flat-head, Phillips, torx, safety torx, hex bit set
- 1/4" socket set, ratchet, break-over bar, 12", 6", 1" extensions and screw-bit attachment
- same as above in 3/8"
- 1/2" break-over bar and 12" extension with socket to fit tire lugs
- e-torx and torx bit set (as described in first paragraph)
- pliers, vice grips (sm & lg), 3 size of crescents, channel locks, long nosed and diagonal cutters (sm & lg)
- 90 degree full range hex key set
- sharp pocket knife, small and medium file, and emery cloth
- cordless drill & charger & bit set and screw bit adapter
- crimp tool and 3 sizes of wire couplers (red, blue, yellow)
- small roll of blk/red 12AWG & 18AWG hook up wire
- soldering iron, miniature heat gun, solder and heat shrink
- bag of stainless screws various sizes
- small assortment of cabin replacement LEDs, plus running lamps, stop and parking, single headlamp

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Glenn Franco
 

Those are great lists.
I include most of those listed but will have to find my safety triangles and stash them in the Navion. I thought I had every tool known to man including a full set of Whitworth tools but I don't have Torx wrenches. I will have to find a set for the Sprinter and the Jetta since the Germans seed to be pretty fond of using these.

What is this " Alcohol (70% IPA) for cleaning? The strongest IPA I have seen is only about 9% but generally settle on ~6%.

Oh there is one thing I didn't put on the list but will not list it here but may come in handy when traveling through Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis and Chicago and it's not a white flag. I generally try to avoid all big cities if at all possible. I will go way out of my way to skirt Chicago when going west from Michigan. I have incurred too much vehicle damage from the poorly maintained roads. Lost a set of simulators in July and watched then take off like frisbee's on I80/94 sourth of Chicago. Atlanta on the other hand is hard to avoid but the roads are in good condition but with heavy traffic.

Just my 2 cents worth
Glenn 06 Navion 23H 38k mi


On Fri, Sep 18, 2020 at 1:41 PM Richard Filcoff via groups.io <rfilcoff=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Don,

Very nice list.

Adding:

moving pad ($5 from Harbor Freight) to lay on when working under RV.

Headlamp with spare batteries (Li ion type preferred due to brightness & run time)

Gorilla Tape black (optional, also clear)

Alcohol (70% IPA) for cleaning  (small bottle)

Paint thinner/mineral spirits for cleaning (small bottle)

Safety glasses

Goes without say, but better have a good first aid kit handy if you plan to be working on vehicle.  Especially need eyewash.

Rick Filcoff

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of old_b4_my_time
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2020 11:37 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] "mission critical" spare parts

 

A set of both e-torx sockets and torx bits on 3/8" drive for your tool bag...... These could come in handy like they did for me driving in a remote location when the alternator went out.   While the shop could fix an alternator, they did not have any torx wrenches on hand and could not have removed the alternator without them.   I shared with the mechanic and he was very grateful as was I that they were on board.

Other passing thoughts ....
- fold out triangles and florescent safety vest
- window squeegee and ice scraper
- towels & window cleaner
- spare boost relay (solenoid)  if you use conventional batteries
- spare keys (the more the better and hide one door key under vehicle frame if you can find a secure spot)
- white flag for antenna (if you travel in non-cell coverage areas)
- flashlights and back-up flashlights
- batteries for flashlights and remote controls and extra battery button for key door unlock dongle
- duct and electrical tape and scotch tape and thumb tacks (for notes on offices and notices and receipts on your vehicle)
- light tarp if you are willing to slide under the vehicle to make minor repairs
- blankets and heavy clothing if traveling in cold climates for furnace-failure situation
- first aid kit
- non-perishable foods for a break-down day (failed refrigerator or held up at a repair shop)
- fold up water bags to tote-in water
- 100' flat collapsing roll-able vinyl hose
- high pressure regulator, y-connector and hand spray attachment
- bungees, small roll of soft dog fence wire & stiffer bailing wire for tying up anything that comes loose
- various rope sizes and blind cord if you have the sliding type "friction bound by cord" style folding accordion shades
- various flare-it end to 1/2" pipe pieces and shut off valves
- ant poison (liquid & granule), bug spray, mosquito repellent and mice bait stuffed inside hollow supporting under-rails

In my tool bag and parts bin I also carry:
- scan gauge for engine diagnostics
- multi-meter (if you know how to use it)
- multi-meter (to check campground voltages if you don't have surge protector)
- full set of mini-screwdrivers (phone repair, small electronics, glasses, etc.)
- set of flat head/ Phillips screw drivers including a full bit drive set with flat-head, Phillips, torx, safety torx, hex bit set
- 1/4" socket set, ratchet, break-over bar, 12", 6", 1" extensions and screw-bit attachment
- same as above in 3/8"
- 1/2" break-over bar and 12" extension with socket to fit tire lugs
- e-torx and torx bit set (as described in first paragraph)
- pliers, vice grips (sm & lg), 3 size of crescents, channel locks, long nosed and diagonal cutters (sm & lg)
- 90 degree full range hex key set
- sharp pocket knife, small and medium file, and emery cloth
- cordless drill & charger & bit set and screw bit adapter
- crimp tool and 3 sizes of wire couplers (red, blue, yellow)
- small roll of blk/red 12AWG & 18AWG hook up wire
- soldering iron, miniature heat gun, solder and heat shrink
- bag of stainless screws various sizes
- small assortment of cabin replacement LEDs, plus running lamps, stop and parking, single headlamp

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Richard Filcoff
 

IPA = isopropyl alcohol.

Commonly available: 50%, 70% & 91%

Want 70% as 50% is too weak to be a good cleaner. ( Need at least 60%  to be considered germ killer/antimicrobial.)  91% can damage some surfaces including plastics.

Rick

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn Franco
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2020 1:49 PM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] "mission critical" spare parts

 

Those are great lists.

I include most of those listed but will have to find my safety triangles and stash them in the Navion. I thought I had every tool known to man including a full set of Whitworth tools but I don't have Torx wrenches. I will have to find a set for the Sprinter and the Jetta since the Germans seed to be pretty fond of using these.

 

What is this " Alcohol (70% IPA) for cleaning? The strongest IPA I have seen is only about 9% but generally settle on ~6%.

 

Oh there is one thing I didn't put on the list but will not list it here but may come in handy when traveling through Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis and Chicago and it's not a white flag. I generally try to avoid all big cities if at all possible. I will go way out of my way to skirt Chicago when going west from Michigan. I have incurred too much vehicle damage from the poorly maintained roads. Lost a set of simulators in July and watched then take off like frisbee's on I80/94 sourth of Chicago. Atlanta on the other hand is hard to avoid but the roads are in good condition but with heavy traffic.

 

Just my 2 cents worth

Glenn 06 Navion 23H 38k mi

 

On Fri, Sep 18, 2020 at 1:41 PM Richard Filcoff via groups.io <rfilcoff=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Don,

Very nice list.

Adding:

moving pad ($5 from Harbor Freight) to lay on when working under RV.

Headlamp with spare batteries (Li ion type preferred due to brightness & run time)

Gorilla Tape black (optional, also clear)

Alcohol (70% IPA) for cleaning  (small bottle)

Paint thinner/mineral spirits for cleaning (small bottle)

Safety glasses

Goes without say, but better have a good first aid kit handy if you plan to be working on vehicle.  Especially need eyewash.

Rick Filcoff

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of old_b4_my_time
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2020 11:37 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] "mission critical" spare parts

 

A set of both e-torx sockets and torx bits on 3/8" drive for your tool bag...... These could come in handy like they did for me driving in a remote location when the alternator went out.   While the shop could fix an alternator, they did not have any torx wrenches on hand and could not have removed the alternator without them.   I shared with the mechanic and he was very grateful as was I that they were on board.

Other passing thoughts ....
- fold out triangles and florescent safety vest
- window squeegee and ice scraper
- towels & window cleaner
- spare boost relay (solenoid)  if you use conventional batteries
- spare keys (the more the better and hide one door key under vehicle frame if you can find a secure spot)
- white flag for antenna (if you travel in non-cell coverage areas)
- flashlights and back-up flashlights
- batteries for flashlights and remote controls and extra battery button for key door unlock dongle
- duct and electrical tape and scotch tape and thumb tacks (for notes on offices and notices and receipts on your vehicle)
- light tarp if you are willing to slide under the vehicle to make minor repairs
- blankets and heavy clothing if traveling in cold climates for furnace-failure situation
- first aid kit
- non-perishable foods for a break-down day (failed refrigerator or held up at a repair shop)
- fold up water bags to tote-in water
- 100' flat collapsing roll-able vinyl hose
- high pressure regulator, y-connector and hand spray attachment
- bungees, small roll of soft dog fence wire & stiffer bailing wire for tying up anything that comes loose
- various rope sizes and blind cord if you have the sliding type "friction bound by cord" style folding accordion shades
- various flare-it end to 1/2" pipe pieces and shut off valves
- ant poison (liquid & granule), bug spray, mosquito repellent and mice bait stuffed inside hollow supporting under-rails

In my tool bag and parts bin I also carry:
- scan gauge for engine diagnostics
- multi-meter (if you know how to use it)
- multi-meter (to check campground voltages if you don't have surge protector)
- full set of mini-screwdrivers (phone repair, small electronics, glasses, etc.)
- set of flat head/ Phillips screw drivers including a full bit drive set with flat-head, Phillips, torx, safety torx, hex bit set
- 1/4" socket set, ratchet, break-over bar, 12", 6", 1" extensions and screw-bit attachment
- same as above in 3/8"
- 1/2" break-over bar and 12" extension with socket to fit tire lugs
- e-torx and torx bit set (as described in first paragraph)
- pliers, vice grips (sm & lg), 3 size of crescents, channel locks, long nosed and diagonal cutters (sm & lg)
- 90 degree full range hex key set
- sharp pocket knife, small and medium file, and emery cloth
- cordless drill & charger & bit set and screw bit adapter
- crimp tool and 3 sizes of wire couplers (red, blue, yellow)
- small roll of blk/red 12AWG & 18AWG hook up wire
- soldering iron, miniature heat gun, solder and heat shrink
- bag of stainless screws various sizes
- small assortment of cabin replacement LEDs, plus running lamps, stop and parking, single headlamp

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


MichiganView
 

LOL… Don, you made me tired reading your extensive list of items, however, I must admit I must be much like you, since I also carry along at least 90% of what is on the list ;-)

Happy Trails !!   Bill  V12J  MI  …LOL/ROTF


old_b4_my_time
 

I know it's overkill but maybe it comes from being a boy scout I guess .... not being the being prepared part but needing all the equipment sold in the back of the magazine "Boys's Life" LOL.

Another thing is to prepare for middle of the night emergencies that typically strike one when they are in the damnedest places like:
- cough medicine
- pain relievers
- benadryl
- antacid
- alka seltzer
- dental floss
- dental pick
- swim ear
- sun block
- aloe vera or burn relief
- fire burn cream & large bandage
- bandage tape & band-aids
- elastic bandage or ankle wrap
- anti itch cream
- baking soda
- lotrimin
- imodium
- pepto bismol
- decongestant

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Richard Filcoff
 

Nice list!  We also carry generic Fluonase and generic Claritin.  This combination seems to work for me to stop a sinus infection within a day or two.

Don’t know if was previously mentioned, however, we carry a magnifiying glass and tweezers.

Also instant hot/cold pack

Rick Filcoff

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of old_b4_my_time
Sent: Saturday, September 19, 2020 9:04 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] "mission critical" spare parts

 

I know it's overkill but maybe it comes from being a boy scout I guess .... not being the being prepared part but needing all the equipment sold in the back of the magazine "Boys's Life" LOL.

Another thing is to prepare for middle of the night emergencies that typically strike one when they are in the damnedest places like:
- cough medicine
- pain relievers
- benadryl
- antacid
- alka seltzer
- dental floss
- dental pick
- swim ear
- sun block
- aloe vera or burn relief
- fire burn cream & large bandage
- bandage tape & band-aids
- elastic bandage or ankle wrap
- anti itch cream
- baking soda
- lotrimin
- imodium
- pepto bismol
- decongestant

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


bike_for_life2003
 
Edited

Greetings Wayne,

You make some good points here... The title of the thread is "Mission Critical Spare Parts".... and it seems many of the posts are off-topic with laundry lists of all kinds of stuff which are not spare parts.

We carry some items that are not mission critical but sometimes useful to have such as duct tape, electrical tape, sip ties, etc...  We do carry a decent handyman's tool kit with most tools we'd need for minor repairs...  but these are not "spare parts", just tools to perhaps use those spare parts.  

As an advocate of weight reduction, limited storage, and keeping it simple... I like to think like a sailor or spaceflight planner...  the whole point of the thread is items that are "mission critical" which one could use her/himself to effect a roadside repair or hand over to a mechanic because they are so M-B Sprinter specific they may be hard to find...  

It all depends on one's aversion to risk... if one stays generally within cell phone coverage and has a reliable roadside assistance program... not many spare parts need to be carried.... If one does a lot of boondocking off the beaten trail and outside phone coverage, perhaps a few more survival items might be advisable.  

I personall carry a fuel filter, oil filter, some motor oil, some transmission fluid, some coolant, a serpentine belt, some tape for emergency hose repairs, a fuse kit, a breaker bar for the lug nuts, a can of penetrating oil, a variety of zip ties, and a relatively robust folding tool kit as noted above.  These are what I consider to be "mission essential"...  

As one of our other colleagues once quipped, "If Walmart has it, I don't carry it.  If Walmart doesn't have it, I don't need it."...  I would extend that to add nationwide auto parts stores for things like starters, solenoids, etc....

That's our approach and it has served us well with 2 RVs since 2012.... Of course, YMMV.

-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


Dick Stevenson
 

Hi all, Off the grid for  few days, but will read and respond to the MC Spare Parts posts when I return. Dick


SCOT NICHOLLS
 

One spare part I'm considering dumping in the interest of keeping weight down is the spare tire. I'm not sure I could physically wrangle it down off its mount. My first thought would be to get a hold of road service that could repair or replace the tire roadside. As I approach 70, I can only recall 1 blowout in a pickup truck at highway speed. This could go on the risk list between hitting a unicorn and being hit by a meteor.
Am I being foolish!


SCOT NICHOLLS
 

Oops,
"Sign off"

Scot Nicholls, 2015 Navion J, San Jose Ca