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propane sensor


Mary
 

After all the smoke from the fires, we hear a beep in our 2015 View G. We found that the propane sensor was flashing red and green. We pushed the button and it went to green and no more beeping.  We thought everything was good. Several times since then it has gone off. We push the button and it goes off. This sensor is on the wall that's beneath the air conditioner/heater control. I mentioned the smoke thinking maybe this has something to do with it.
I hope this makes sense. Any suggestions?
Mary


irabid1
 

It is probably at the end of its lifespan and needs to be replaced. They last 5-7 years and that is what mine did. 

Deborah 12NM 125k miles California


On Sep 20, 2020, at 8:48 PM, Mary via groups.io <mlimpic@...> wrote:

After all the smoke from the fires, we hear a beep in our 2015 View G. We found that the propane sensor was flashing red and green. We pushed the button and it went to green and no more beeping.  We thought everything was good. Several times since then it has gone off. We push the button and it goes off. This sensor is on the wall that's beneath the air conditioner/heater control. I mentioned the smoke thinking maybe this has something to do with it.
I hope this makes sense. Any suggestions?
Mary


MichiganView
 

Mary -

I am no propane expert, but if I were in a similar situation what I might try for troubleshooting is::  1/  shut off LP  2/  open front vents and or windows and open the rear bath vent to expel propane fumes  3/  drive the rig for 15-20 miles or more to ‘air out’ any residual LP, if present  4/  check the monitor again to see if it still beeps with presumably no propane in the coach…  As I understand things — your smoke detector *could* be set off by ionized smoke particles from forest fires in the vicinity, but not sure about propane sensor function.   Bill  J12V  MI 

"After all the smoke from the fires, we hear a beep in our 2015 View G. We found that the propane sensor was flashing red and green. We pushed the button and it went to green and no more beeping.  We thought everything was good. Several times since then it has gone off. We push the button and it goes off. This sensor is on the wall that's beneath the air conditioner/heater control. I mentioned the smoke thinking maybe this has something to do with it.
I hope this makes sense. Any suggestions?”   Mary


John Kirby
 

There is a five year life built in to the sensors.  It has to be replaced.  I just did ours on our 2015 VJ.
JohnK NW WA


On Sep 21, 2020, at 4:46 AM, MichiganView <deepthinkers@...> wrote:

Mary -

I am no propane expert, but if I were in a similar situation what I might try for troubleshooting is::  1/  shut off LP  2/  open front vents and or windows and open the rear bath vent to expel propane fumes  3/  drive the rig for 15-20 miles or more to ‘air out’ any residual LP, if present  4/  check the monitor again to see if it still beeps with presumably no propane in the coach…  As I understand things — your smoke detector *could* be set off by ionized smoke particles from forest fires in the vicinity, but not sure about propane sensor function.   Bill  J12V  MI 

"After all the smoke from the fires, we hear a beep in our 2015 View G. We found that the propane sensor was flashing red and green. We pushed the button and it went to green and no more beeping.  We thought everything was good. Several times since then it has gone off. We push the button and it goes off. This sensor is on the wall that's beneath the air conditioner/heater control. I mentioned the smoke thinking maybe this has something to do with it.
I hope this makes sense. Any suggestions?”   Mary


Mary
 

Could you tell me how to replace this?  Or where I could go to find out?
Thank you,
Mary


John Kirby
 

I purchased one on Amazon for $54.99 search for “MTI INDUSTRIES 30442PBR 12V Propane/Gas Detector”.  But I see the listed price is now $68.22!

Anyway look for the one that is just like the one you have installed (mine was brown).

The new one will come without the connector on the wires.  After unscrewing and removing the old one note which wire colors are connected to the coach wires.  Cut the connector off the coach wires and use wire nuts to join the new sensor wires (or crimp new connectors on both sets of wires). Re-install it and you done for another five years!

John K 20016 VJ NW WA


John Kirby
 

One more note :  Remove the fuse before cutting off the connector!!!


Alan '16NM
 
Edited

Mary,
Here's a video of replacement procedure.

Propane Detector Replacement
--
Alan

16 NM in GA
17 Honda Fit Toad


William Finley
 

Just to confirm the recommendation to replace the sensor... I replaced mine and 2 years later it went off due to hair spray in rig. I tried vacuuming it out and blowing it out and then had random alarms over the next 12 months which drove me the wife and my small dog completely crazy.

I wasn't happy as the unit was only 2 then 3 years old but I finally got a Guage and went through a propane leak down test and found nothing wrong zero propane leaks. At that point I purchased a new propane alarm and replaced it. 

Two screws and pull it out disconnected the two wires and it's gone off one time since when the stove was left oh so slightly on... So I know it works as expected.

Don't wait just replace it I'm not aware of anything that you can do to fix or correct false alarms. 

For what it's worth.

Bill 06vh

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020, 10:52 AM Alan '16NM via groups.io <langfordalan=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Mary,
Here's a video of replacement procedure.

Propane Detector Replacement
--
Alan

16 NM in GA
17 Honda Fit Toad


Mary
 

Thank you all for the responses. They were so helpful!! I love this group!
Mary
15 VG


hikerbuddy01
 

The propane sensor will also beep if the coach batteries are low.
--
Bob
'08NH
TX


Mary
 

Where is the fuse? 


John Kirby
 

I don't know where your DC fuse panel is on a G but it is a brown cover about 6" x 10".  From the center unclip the right side cover and remove it, inside you should see a vertical row of automotive type fuses.  Next to them should be a hand written list explaining what their function is, one will say "LP Detector" ( mine is the second one up from the bottom).  Pull the fuse out to work on the detector and replace it when done (you may need a small pair of pliers to grip it).

John K 2016 VJ NW WA


Dick Stevenson
 

Hi John,

Agree about propane sensors.

Just an FYI with regard to sniffers and life span: I believe that CO monitors usually (always?) have an expiry date that needs attending to as there is no warning signal.

My best, Dick Stevenson