Topics

Satisfaction Survey


bike_for_life2003
 

Greetings Fellow V/N Enthusiasts!

We only tend to hear tales of woe regarding reliability of Sprinter-based RVs.  This can tend to create an attitude a former boss called the "Ain't It Awful Syndrome".

But we have no idea what the reliability rate of different components is because we don't have the number needed for the denominator in such a calculation.

I wonder how many satisfied V/N owners are listening here who have 100,000 miles or more on their V/N or Sprinter-based RVs.

If you are a happy owner, please reply! 
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


waydigs
 

Having owned two previous diesel mo-ho's  (both Holiday Ramblers)  I can tell you that the View is by far the most reliable and the  nicest quality.   While comparing 40 foot pushers to a 24 foot MBZ / Winnebago  isn't really the same vehicle, the HR's were just thrown together and shipped to the dealer about 80 % complete.  

So, unless you have owned something else, don't compare the Views to something you have never owned.
Wayne '16 "V" 


irabid1
 

I assumed when I purchased my first and one and only RV that a house on wheels would inherently have additional built in costs.  I also knew I would be paying for service and of course it was a Mercedes Benz.  I have traveled over 125k miles since I purchased 12NM new.  Yes I pay to maintain and improve the vehicle and the coach.  I travel 4-5 months of the year with dogs and seek out locations off the beaten path.  I think this is the best purchase I have ever made.  Unlike my house it depreciates but the travel, memories and opportunities I have had with the comfort of traveling in a self contained home are innumerable.  I think the fact you can get caught in the middle of nowhere with typical repairs or breakdowns on either what would be a home repair or vehicle repair can seem daunting compared to what you would typically encounter if you were at home.  However, that is all part of the process.  Put a house on wheels- drive like crazy and if you expect it to stand up like a brick and mortar house and have the same response for repairs- it is unrealistic.  I love my RV- yes I would do it again in a heartbeat.  I have been caught in places I don’t necessarily feel comfortable and had to make do to get somewhere strapping stairs up that would not retract, generator problems, water pump issues, engine lights but it is life and a good one at that.  Watch the movie “Martian” - the take away from that movie- if you have a problem “Solve one problem at a time” I bought this in fall of 2011- there have been 2 years due to medical issues I have not traveled much.  Normally I travel cross country and into Canada every year.  Challenges - always but I have met more wonderful people, seen outstanding places, enjoyed Boondockers, Harvest Host and a myriad of state, federal and Canadian parks and wilderness.  And of course I have benefited immeasurably from this group. Thank you all and yes there should be improvements but that is of course the way it is with all things.

Deborah 12NM California

On Sep 30, 2020, at 6:45 AM, bike_for_life2003 <guzowskip@...> wrote:



Greetings Fellow V/N Enthusiasts!

We only tend to hear tales of woe regarding reliability of Sprinter-based RVs.  This can tend to create an attitude a former boss called the "Ain't It Awful Syndrome".

But we have no idea what the reliability rate of different components is because we don't have the number needed for the denominator in such a calculation.

I wonder how many satisfied V/N owners are listening here who have 100,000 miles or more on their V/N or Sprinter-based RVs.

If you are a happy owner, please reply! 
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


David J
 

Almost. We have 90,000 miles on an '06 Sprinter-based Roadtrek, and in the past few months sold a 1983 Airstream diesel and bought an '06 View. We have been through the turbo resonator issues but overall completely satisfied. We have had a total of 8 RVs over the yers, and researched a lot more before deciding on the T1N View. Overall completely satisfied and looking forward to many more years.


Mike beer
 

I Echo Deborah. Realistic expectations and wonderful adventures. I was stung with the DEF heater/NOx sensor issue for $3200 Two months ago yet I still love my AV (adventure vehicle).
We plan to waterski over the upcoming emission angst and keep on truckin’.
Mike Beer
15VJ 


On Sep 30, 2020, at 11:32 AM, David J <dlj04@...> wrote:

Almost. We have 90,000 miles on an '06 Sprinter-based Roadtrek, and in the past few months sold a 1983 Airstream diesel and bought an '06 View. We have been through the turbo resonator issues but overall completely satisfied. We have had a total of 8 RVs over the yers, and researched a lot more before deciding on the T1N View. Overall completely satisfied and looking forward to many more years.

--
Mike Beer
15VJ
Mpls, MN


David J
 

I can add a couple of other angles that might help this discussion. One is based on experience with Airstream, Roadtrek and Winnebago on the coach side of the equation. We also had a 1983 Winnebago Minnie Winnie which is sort of a predecessor to the View. There is a clear path of what they've learned in terms of making things fit and function. The other is from a couple of experienced Mercedes mechanics about the Sprinter (and the major issue for later model years, the emissions control system.) Bottom line, if you drive your Sprinter a lot as it was intended, the problems are minimized. They don't like to sit. Key to satisfaction with the later models would be to work with a Mercedes mechanic to find a maintenance schedule that will allow you to get ahead of things that need to be exercised, cleaned etc. before they fail. Not hard or expensive, but needs attention.


waydigs
 

Mike:
I think maybe the recall may be able to help you.  Or at least the $3200 will off set your costs.
Wayne 16"V"


younglr98
 

Ditto to Wayne and Deborah! I have a Life that is too good to be True, and the View is far and away the best addition to my quality of Life EVER!!!!! 8 years, 176,000 mi(95k by me). However, I do nearly all my own work. If I ever replace it, doubtful, I’d go to. Different mfg chassis.
Better availability of parts and service, and ubiquitous mechanics in N America. FWIW
Roger 07VJ T1N! E WA


waydigs
 

Rodger:
Having owned nearly "one of everything" over my 75 years, I can tell you with some certainty that you will NEVER get 176,000 miles out of anything else without a lot more work  ( and money)  than you had to do to the MBZ.   
Wayne '16 "V" in Calif.

On Wed, Sep 30, 2020 at 11:40 AM younglr98 via groups.io <younglr98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Ditto to Wayne and Deborah!  I have a Life that is too good to be True, and the View is far and away the best addition to my quality of Life EVER!!!!!   8 years, 176,000 mi(95k by me). However, I do nearly all my own work. If I ever replace it, doubtful, I’d go to. Different mfg chassis.
Better availability of parts and service, and ubiquitous mechanics in N America.  FWIW
Roger 07VJ T1N! E WA






Glenn Franco
 

We have had numerous RV's since we started back in 1973 traveling with the RV's. We have enjoyed the RV life and almost all of our vacation time has been spent RV ing.
Camped from Tents to pop ups to a Chevy Trans van Class B,  Jayco Class C 26ft, Bounder 35ft. These were gas powered and the worst was the Jayco purchased new and the best most reliable was the Fleetwood Bounder that we kept for about 15 years and never had a problem other than with the thirsty 460 ci engine that never lacked power except Eisenhower pass and grade going east outside of Salt Lake City.
The Jayco literally fell apart within months of buying it new. I could go on with the problems but they were never ending. Problems were with the coach and not the Ford Chassis.

Buying the Itasca Navion with ~32,000 miles on it was a very disappointing experience.

We have never had so many problems with the chassis on any of our RV's. The Sprinter Broke down 3 times within 5,000 miles. The first breakdown was the Starter on our first trip to the Everglades. A no start that ended up needing a Starter replacement.

Second problem that had us stranded was a Start Error trying to get it out of storage. Had to replace the new chassis battery and Fuse Block #1.

Third was the trip from HELL with multiple problems on our trip to Washington state from Michigan.
 - Cruise control was intermittent on the way out west. We never knew when it was going to work.
 - The Generator was non cooperative and would not supply power to the coach. Come to find out that the Giant Brains at Winnebego requires you to plug the shore power plug back into the receptacle above the cord. We have had 2 other motorhomes with Gen Sets and never had to do that since the switch over was automatic. Had to call Winnebego on it.
 - On the return trip from Washington Slide decided it didn't want to cooperate and wouldn't move in or out. I had to rig up a jumper to move it in and out.
 - Pulling into Yellowstone to check into the campsite the vehicle would not start. Instead I got the dreaded "All warning lights lit and the AC fan running but no power". Managed to finagle the Shifter, disconnect and reconnect the battery and finally started. Repeated this problem 4 more times on I 90 until it died on the outskirts of Rapid City and had to wait till 3 am in the morning to get a tow to Floyds Frietliner and Sprinter Dealer. It was that or get towed to Sioux Falls 300 miles away at a cost of ~$2000 to a Mercedes Dealer. Floyds never even came out to look at the vehicle just took the keys and were very condescending. They unbelievably let the only 2 Sprinter Mechanics to on vacation at the same time right when we showed up. It took over a week to complete the repairs which was a bad Fuse Block #1. I had just purchased a new one 2 months prior. Talk about lousy Mercedes reliability and crappy parts.
 - When we picked it up the coach batteries were completely dead and we couldn't run the generator. The new coach batteries being AGM wouldn't take a charge so they needed to be replaced.
Consequently with dead coach batteries and a gen set not running of course the refrigerator would not run so you can only imagine the mess we had.
 - To Top things off, the cover on the Power vent blew off and was wide open to rain. I had to cover it with plastic since no one has a replacement. Thank God for Gorilla Tape!
 - We camped overnight before returning home at a local campground. When we left in the morning I was greeted with the park brake warning light on and constant beeping. I pulled the cover off the lever reconnected the switch but I never got it to stop beeping. It beeped for 1200 return miles back to Michigan. Oh and driving around Chicago our Wheel Hubcap Simulators made like Frisbees and are somewhere just South of Chicago.

At this point my wife and adult kids told me to get rid of this lemon since its the worst vehicle I have ever purchased.

Luckily we had our Miata in Tow for the whole trip and it turned out to be our escape vehicle since we drove it 1200 miles back to Michigan and waited to get the call to pick up the Navion. Then we drove it 1200 miles back.

So far I haven't sold the Navion, instead I put a new set of BFG Commercial tires on it, just replaced all of the coolant hoses, will be doing a trans service this week. Replaced the lousy hubcaps with trim rings and the commercial black Mercedes plastic center caps.

I must just be a glutton for punishment as I keep dumping money into this thing. I think the next step is counseling.

Glenn 06 Itasca Navion 23H now 38k mi



On Wed, Sep 30, 2020 at 1:17 PM David J <dlj04@...> wrote:
I can add a couple of other angles that might help this discussion. One is based on experience with Airstream, Roadtrek and Winnebago on the coach side of the equation. We also had a 1983 Winnebago Minnie Winnie which is sort of a predecessor to the View. There is a clear path of what they've learned in terms of making things fit and function. The other is from a couple of experienced Mercedes mechanics about the Sprinter (and the major issue for later model years, the emissions control system.) Bottom line, if you drive your Sprinter a lot as it was intended, the problems are minimized. They don't like to sit. Key to satisfaction with the later models would be to work with a Mercedes mechanic to find a maintenance schedule that will allow you to get ahead of things that need to be exercised, cleaned etc. before they fail. Not hard or expensive, but needs attention.


Poul
 

We have a 2008/07 NiQ CL with 127500 miles. First 6 cyl in USA, no def, but particulate filter. We purchased new and we love Miss iQ!
Have only had a few MB issues - warrantee and not.
The Winni-house is very well designed and rock solid, aside from a few minor modifications or personalizations, we wouldn’t change a thing.  However, I hope Winnebago have got better check on their Quality Control now than they had in 2008.
Poul P in WA - 2008 NiQ CL


waydigs
 

Poul in Wash.
You have not seen a lack of QC until you have owned a Holiday Rambler pusher.  They built them to about 80 % done, and shp them off to the poor dealer.  Unless you have a good dealer, you are up the creek.We were lucky, bought from DeMartini in Grass Valley Ca. a quality establishment that takes care of its customers.

My last HR was built the year they finally folded up and shut the doors, I swear it was made up  of used, defective, crappy parts that they found laying around.  A disaster frm DAY # 1...

NOW, I see they are building again.  Never again for me, fool me once- your fault, fool me twice--MY fault.
Wayne '16 "V" model; happy as a clam at high tide.


Mike beer
 

Thanks Wayne.... The $$$ will be a salve.😎


On Sep 30, 2020, at 1:16 PM, waydigs <diggsmail44@...> wrote:


Mike:
I think maybe the recall may be able to help you.  Or at least the $3200 will off set your costs.
Wayne 16"V"

--
Mike Beer
15VJ
Mpls, MN


JPS
 

If you have not already done so, consider replacing the turbo Resonnator?  Jim 07VH FLOH


On Wed, Sep 30, 2020 at 4:48 PM Glenn Franco <brakey6666@...> wrote:
We have had numerous RV's since we started back in 1973 traveling with the RV's. We have enjoyed the RV life and almost all of our vacation time has been spent RV ing.
Camped from Tents to pop ups to a Chevy Trans van Class B,  Jayco Class C 26ft, Bounder 35ft. These were gas powered and the worst was the Jayco purchased new and the best most reliable was the Fleetwood Bounder that we kept for about 15 years and never had a problem other than with the thirsty 460 ci engine that never lacked power except Eisenhower pass and grade going east outside of Salt Lake City.
The Jayco literally fell apart within months of buying it new. I could go on with the problems but they were never ending. Problems were with the coach and not the Ford Chassis.

Buying the Itasca Navion with ~32,000 miles on it was a very disappointing experience.

We have never had so many problems with the chassis on any of our RV's. The Sprinter Broke down 3 times within 5,000 miles. The first breakdown was the Starter on our first trip to the Everglades. A no start that ended up needing a Starter replacement.

Second problem that had us stranded was a Start Error trying to get it out of storage. Had to replace the new chassis battery and Fuse Block #1.

Third was the trip from HELL with multiple problems on our trip to Washington state from Michigan.
 - Cruise control was intermittent on the way out west. We never knew when it was going to work.
 - The Generator was non cooperative and would not supply power to the coach. Come to find out that the Giant Brains at Winnebego requires you to plug the shore power plug back into the receptacle above the cord. We have had 2 other motorhomes with Gen Sets and never had to do that since the switch over was automatic. Had to call Winnebego on it.
 - On the return trip from Washington Slide decided it didn't want to cooperate and wouldn't move in or out. I had to rig up a jumper to move it in and out.
 - Pulling into Yellowstone to check into the campsite the vehicle would not start. Instead I got the dreaded "All warning lights lit and the AC fan running but no power". Managed to finagle the Shifter, disconnect and reconnect the battery and finally started. Repeated this problem 4 more times on I 90 until it died on the outskirts of Rapid City and had to wait till 3 am in the morning to get a tow to Floyds Frietliner and Sprinter Dealer. It was that or get towed to Sioux Falls 300 miles away at a cost of ~$2000 to a Mercedes Dealer. Floyds never even came out to look at the vehicle just took the keys and were very condescending. They unbelievably let the only 2 Sprinter Mechanics to on vacation at the same time right when we showed up. It took over a week to complete the repairs which was a bad Fuse Block #1. I had just purchased a new one 2 months prior. Talk about lousy Mercedes reliability and crappy parts.
 - When we picked it up the coach batteries were completely dead and we couldn't run the generator. The new coach batteries being AGM wouldn't take a charge so they needed to be replaced.
Consequently with dead coach batteries and a gen set not running of course the refrigerator would not run so you can only imagine the mess we had.
 - To Top things off, the cover on the Power vent blew off and was wide open to rain. I had to cover it with plastic since no one has a replacement. Thank God for Gorilla Tape!
 - We camped overnight before returning home at a local campground. When we left in the morning I was greeted with the park brake warning light on and constant beeping. I pulled the cover off the lever reconnected the switch but I never got it to stop beeping. It beeped for 1200 return miles back to Michigan. Oh and driving around Chicago our Wheel Hubcap Simulators made like Frisbees and are somewhere just South of Chicago.

At this point my wife and adult kids told me to get rid of this lemon since its the worst vehicle I have ever purchased.

Luckily we had our Miata in Tow for the whole trip and it turned out to be our escape vehicle since we drove it 1200 miles back to Michigan and waited to get the call to pick up the Navion. Then we drove it 1200 miles back.

So far I haven't sold the Navion, instead I put a new set of BFG Commercial tires on it, just replaced all of the coolant hoses, will be doing a trans service this week. Replaced the lousy hubcaps with trim rings and the commercial black Mercedes plastic center caps.

I must just be a glutton for punishment as I keep dumping money into this thing. I think the next step is counseling.

Glenn 06 Itasca Navion 23H now 38k mi



On Wed, Sep 30, 2020 at 1:17 PM David J <dlj04@...> wrote:
I can add a couple of other angles that might help this discussion. One is based on experience with Airstream, Roadtrek and Winnebago on the coach side of the equation. We also had a 1983 Winnebago Minnie Winnie which is sort of a predecessor to the View. There is a clear path of what they've learned in terms of making things fit and function. The other is from a couple of experienced Mercedes mechanics about the Sprinter (and the major issue for later model years, the emissions control system.) Bottom line, if you drive your Sprinter a lot as it was intended, the problems are minimized. They don't like to sit. Key to satisfaction with the later models would be to work with a Mercedes mechanic to find a maintenance schedule that will allow you to get ahead of things that need to be exercised, cleaned etc. before they fail. Not hard or expensive, but needs attention.


Poul
 

Waydigs 
We are also very happy with our 08 NiQ , especially after the first year.  But retired from selling/managing capital heavy equipment/projects I know the cost of on-site warrantee work and the embarrassment of receiving inferior products and added time/cost for repairs, adjustments and confidence loss.
Just making the point that good and complete ‘quality control’ is as important as having a great designed product that is well put together. QC saves money and keep you in business,  maybe not so in 2008 for some.
Poul P in WA - 2008 NiQ CL


markcrewson@...
 

06V23J in Gig Harbor, WA. I have 130k on my view and have found it very reliable. I've dealt with a holes in the supercharger hoses, but can't think of any major repairs. I usually get 19mpg and do most routine maintenance myself. It's been all over the USA, normally garaged in western Washington.
I do manually downshift to keep the rpm's up on inclines and have not done much towing. It's rpm torque sweet spot seems to be in the lower 3000's and doesn't like stress below 2500, although cruises on the flat plain at about 2200rpm. 


Jake
 

Not at 100K yet but I'll get there, I'm sure.  Bought my 07NH in April 2018.  It had 38,000 miles.  I've been full timing ever since.  So in the last 2.5ish years I've taken it up to 82,000 miles.  I've been super happy; never had any of the other RV horror stories.

Only breakdowns were two separate instances of the famous turbo resonator & hose, which I field replaced twice (finally installed resonator eliminator).  I had Dr. A train me for a day while we did service a year ago, including replacing serp belt.  I need to deal with a singing EGR valve and an in-tank fuel pump that buzzes like angry wasps after 8 hours of driving.  I'm preparing to change my tranny fluid again to be on the safe side (and to remove the Valvoline Max Life red that Upscale Automotive put in it, if they even changed it at all, 20k miles ago).

Coach-wise, a few little problems that were just inconveniences.  Had no TV sound once and had to open up the cabinet to reattach wires that jiggled loose.  Had a water leak last year because the toilet supply line bulged and deformed loose from its flair-it fittings (why the heck did they use that weird ass god-awful white hose there--replace with PEX!).  My converter/charger, a PD4645 installed by the PO, died so I replaced that for like $150.  And the boost solenoid.  

Some things are wearing out.  My over-cab bed cushion has degraded so my bony hips touch the framing.  I have a dog now so I sleep on the jackknife couch with him, and that cushion is no longer feeling new.  The headliner is sloughing away.  I'm still in midlife so this RV life was an experiment.  I didn't expect to love it.  Now that I know I'm in it for the long haul, and therefore staying stationary and working more, I'm starting to fantasize about a real bed--maybe a J or even a small class A like an Allegro Breeze.  Something that can tow a heavier car than my Samurai.

BUT here's the thing.  I have a super reliable MH.  These 5-cyl engines are the best!  And I'm lucky to have one that was well cared for by the two PO's.  I haven't found anything I can't do myself (thanks to y'all's advice!)  I've driven this thing through rivers in Alaska, down washboard roads in Canada, etc. and it hasn't shaken apart.  It's small enough to drive down the PCH/Highway 1 in Cali.  I'm still on the original shocks with no mods and only 1 working rear airbag!  I even drove it up the neighborhood hills in San Francisco (blinding followed Google Maps, dumb).  I would trust it to take me to Argentina if I get brave enough.  

I'm just happy to have an older one.  I do believe the newer ones have more problems due to WBO and all RV mfr's rushing the builds.

My point is, these things are great.  Thanks Paul & Christine for flushing out some of the good news during these negative times.

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop


JPS
 

Jake, FWIW if I were to consider a different unit I would look at a DynaMax 30' unit built on a Dodge 5500 chassis that has a Cummins diesel up front and a bullet proof Japanese transmission. You'll get a real bed and the ability to tow about anything you would care to tow. If new, not a whole lot more expensive then a new V/N. Jim 07VH FLOH


On Sun, Oct 11, 2020 at 2:22 AM Jake via groups.io <jakehoster=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Not at 100K yet but I'll get there, I'm sure.  Bought my 07NH in April 2018.  It had 38,000 miles.  I've been full timing ever since.  So in the last 2.5ish years I've taken it up to 82,000 miles.  I've been super happy; never had any of the other RV horror stories.

Only breakdowns were two separate instances of the famous turbo resonator & hose, which I field replaced twice (finally installed resonator eliminator).  I had Dr. A train me for a day while we did service a year ago, including replacing serp belt.  I need to deal with a singing EGR valve and an in-tank fuel pump that buzzes like angry wasps after 8 hours of driving.  I'm preparing to change my tranny fluid again to be on the safe side (and to remove the Valvoline Max Life red that Upscale Automotive put in it, if they even changed it at all, 20k miles ago).

Coach-wise, a few little problems that were just inconveniences.  Had no TV sound once and had to open up the cabinet to reattach wires that jiggled loose.  Had a water leak last year because the toilet supply line bulged and deformed loose from its flair-it fittings (why the heck did they use that weird ass god-awful white hose there--replace with PEX!).  My converter/charger, a PD4645 installed by the PO, died so I replaced that for like $150.  And the boost solenoid.  

Some things are wearing out.  My over-cab bed cushion has degraded so my bony hips touch the framing.  I have a dog now so I sleep on the jackknife couch with him, and that cushion is no longer feeling new.  The headliner is sloughing away.  I'm still in midlife so this RV life was an experiment.  I didn't expect to love it.  Now that I know I'm in it for the long haul, and therefore staying stationary and working more, I'm starting to fantasize about a real bed--maybe a J or even a small class A like an Allegro Breeze.  Something that can tow a heavier car than my Samurai.

BUT here's the thing.  I have a super reliable MH.  These 5-cyl engines are the best!  And I'm lucky to have one that was well cared for by the two PO's.  I haven't found anything I can't do myself (thanks to y'all's advice!)  I've driven this thing through rivers in Alaska, down washboard roads in Canada, etc. and it hasn't shaken apart.  It's small enough to drive down the PCH/Highway 1 in Cali.  I'm still on the original shocks with no mods and only 1 working rear airbag!  I even drove it up the neighborhood hills in San Francisco (blinding followed Google Maps, dumb).  I would trust it to take me to Argentina if I get brave enough.  

I'm just happy to have an older one.  I do believe the newer ones have more problems due to WBO and all RV mfr's rushing the builds.

My point is, these things are great.  Thanks Paul & Christine for flushing out some of the good news during these negative times.

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop


David Harper
 

That sounds like a fantastic option.  A real truck chassis, with a real truck power train.  I think the sprinter is a great platform for expediter, or commercial use, but the drivetrain seems a bit stretched to accommodate the weight of a fully loaded RV towing another vehicle. Just my opinion.

DHH

2008VJ


On Oct 11, 2020, at 11:52 AM, JPS <selmsan@...> wrote:


Jake, FWIW if I were to consider a different unit I would look at a DynaMax 30' unit built on a Dodge 5500 chassis that has a Cummins diesel up front and a bullet proof Japanese transmission. You'll get a real bed and the ability to tow about anything you would care to tow. If new, not a whole lot more expensive then a new V/N. Jim 07VH FLOH

On Sun, Oct 11, 2020 at 2:22 AM Jake via groups.io <jakehoster=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Not at 100K yet but I'll get there, I'm sure.  Bought my 07NH in April 2018.  It had 38,000 miles.  I've been full timing ever since.  So in the last 2.5ish years I've taken it up to 82,000 miles.  I've been super happy; never had any of the other RV horror stories.

Only breakdowns were two separate instances of the famous turbo resonator & hose, which I field replaced twice (finally installed resonator eliminator).  I had Dr. A train me for a day while we did service a year ago, including replacing serp belt.  I need to deal with a singing EGR valve and an in-tank fuel pump that buzzes like angry wasps after 8 hours of driving.  I'm preparing to change my tranny fluid again to be on the safe side (and to remove the Valvoline Max Life red that Upscale Automotive put in it, if they even changed it at all, 20k miles ago).

Coach-wise, a few little problems that were just inconveniences.  Had no TV sound once and had to open up the cabinet to reattach wires that jiggled loose.  Had a water leak last year because the toilet supply line bulged and deformed loose from its flair-it fittings (why the heck did they use that weird ass god-awful white hose there--replace with PEX!).  My converter/charger, a PD4645 installed by the PO, died so I replaced that for like $150.  And the boost solenoid.  

Some things are wearing out.  My over-cab bed cushion has degraded so my bony hips touch the framing.  I have a dog now so I sleep on the jackknife couch with him, and that cushion is no longer feeling new.  The headliner is sloughing away.  I'm still in midlife so this RV life was an experiment.  I didn't expect to love it.  Now that I know I'm in it for the long haul, and therefore staying stationary and working more, I'm starting to fantasize about a real bed--maybe a J or even a small class A like an Allegro Breeze.  Something that can tow a heavier car than my Samurai.

BUT here's the thing.  I have a super reliable MH.  These 5-cyl engines are the best!  And I'm lucky to have one that was well cared for by the two PO's.  I haven't found anything I can't do myself (thanks to y'all's advice!)  I've driven this thing through rivers in Alaska, down washboard roads in Canada, etc. and it hasn't shaken apart.  It's small enough to drive down the PCH/Highway 1 in Cali.  I'm still on the original shocks with no mods and only 1 working rear airbag!  I even drove it up the neighborhood hills in San Francisco (blinding followed Google Maps, dumb).  I would trust it to take me to Argentina if I get brave enough.  

I'm just happy to have an older one.  I do believe the newer ones have more problems due to WBO and all RV mfr's rushing the builds.

My point is, these things are great.  Thanks Paul & Christine for flushing out some of the good news during these negative times.

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop


lcjn46 Norman
 

They have a car transmission also


On Oct 11, 2020, at 1:56 PM, David Harper <kujisptfl@...> wrote:

That sounds like a fantastic option.  A real truck chassis, with a real truck power train.  I think the sprinter is a great platform for expediter, or commercial use, but the drivetrain seems a bit stretched to accommodate the weight of a fully loaded RV towing another vehicle. Just my opinion.

DHH

2008VJ


On Oct 11, 2020, at 11:52 AM, JPS <selmsan@...> wrote:


Jake, FWIW if I were to consider a different unit I would look at a DynaMax 30' unit built on a Dodge 5500 chassis that has a Cummins diesel up front and a bullet proof Japanese transmission. You'll get a real bed and the ability to tow about anything you would care to tow. If new, not a whole lot more expensive then a new V/N. Jim 07VH FLOH

On Sun, Oct 11, 2020 at 2:22 AM Jake via groups.io <jakehoster=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Not at 100K yet but I'll get there, I'm sure.  Bought my 07NH in April 2018.  It had 38,000 miles.  I've been full timing ever since.  So in the last 2.5ish years I've taken it up to 82,000 miles.  I've been super happy; never had any of the other RV horror stories.

Only breakdowns were two separate instances of the famous turbo resonator & hose, which I field replaced twice (finally installed resonator eliminator).  I had Dr. A train me for a day while we did service a year ago, including replacing serp belt.  I need to deal with a singing EGR valve and an in-tank fuel pump that buzzes like angry wasps after 8 hours of driving.  I'm preparing to change my tranny fluid again to be on the safe side (and to remove the Valvoline Max Life red that Upscale Automotive put in it, if they even changed it at all, 20k miles ago).

Coach-wise, a few little problems that were just inconveniences.  Had no TV sound once and had to open up the cabinet to reattach wires that jiggled loose.  Had a water leak last year because the toilet supply line bulged and deformed loose from its flair-it fittings (why the heck did they use that weird ass god-awful white hose there--replace with PEX!).  My converter/charger, a PD4645 installed by the PO, died so I replaced that for like $150.  And the boost solenoid.  

Some things are wearing out.  My over-cab bed cushion has degraded so my bony hips touch the framing.  I have a dog now so I sleep on the jackknife couch with him, and that cushion is no longer feeling new.  The headliner is sloughing away.  I'm still in midlife so this RV life was an experiment.  I didn't expect to love it.  Now that I know I'm in it for the long haul, and therefore staying stationary and working more, I'm starting to fantasize about a real bed--maybe a J or even a small class A like an Allegro Breeze.  Something that can tow a heavier car than my Samurai.

BUT here's the thing.  I have a super reliable MH.  These 5-cyl engines are the best!  And I'm lucky to have one that was well cared for by the two PO's.  I haven't found anything I can't do myself (thanks to y'all's advice!)  I've driven this thing through rivers in Alaska, down washboard roads in Canada, etc. and it hasn't shaken apart.  It's small enough to drive down the PCH/Highway 1 in Cali.  I'm still on the original shocks with no mods and only 1 working rear airbag!  I even drove it up the neighborhood hills in San Francisco (blinding followed Google Maps, dumb).  I would trust it to take me to Argentina if I get brave enough.  

I'm just happy to have an older one.  I do believe the newer ones have more problems due to WBO and all RV mfr's rushing the builds.

My point is, these things are great.  Thanks Paul & Christine for flushing out some of the good news during these negative times.

--
Jake
2007 Navion 23H
Towing 1987 Samurai tintop