Topics

scan gauge


Dick Stevenson
 

Hi all,
Could I get a fill on the benefits of a scangauge and suggest types/manufacturers? And how hard are they to install?
Thanks, Dick Stevenson


Rick 17VV
 

Checkout https://www.scangauge.com/products/scangauge-ii/. It just plugs into your odbII connector and reads all the codes MB puts out. Helpful to monitor temps, etc. Also a few YouTube video's on it.
--
Rick
17V


old_b4_my_time
 

Personally, I like the Scan Gauge II which provides the  ability to learn near instantly what kind of "situation" I may be in when my "Check Engine" lamp comes on and the Scan Gauge II I use is able to give me the codes on demand.  I keep mine plugged in constantly.  With Google nearby one can then scan the scan code to see what culprit is causing the engine warning and take appropriate action according to the severity.   Likely if it is too severe the vehicle will go into limp mode but if you are not near a service center it's good to know what kind of a condition you may be facing in order to know how soon you need to get into the shop.   For example I recently drove for over a year with many bad glow plug warnings which kept my check engine lamp glowing constantly and I used the scan gauge which I have mounted just below my instrument cluster to scan through the codes each time I started and to make sure no new errors popped up.  I cleared the codes then to watch for new ones with Check Engine as I was driving, knowing the glow plug codes are set only during engine startup.  Knowing the glow plugs didn't really need to be working in the hot weather I was driving in, that allowed me to postpone the repair until something else showed up which was an O2 sensor so at that time I took action and fixed all the open issues including the sensor and glow plugs with new control unit for the plugs as well and at a time that I had access to a shop with reasonable fees instead of doing a "panic stop" at a dealer to break the bank.

During installation I was able to remove my steering wheel shroud and permanently mount my Scan Gauge II below the instrument cluster, replacing the shroud to cover the wire leading up from the ODBII socket to the scan gauge.   Also since a common 8 pin LAN connector is used on the plug going into the gauge model I purchased, you may be able to route the cable if you wish to permanently mount the little elongated display without removing anything because the cable will snake through many areas quite easily but of course be sure to wrap some tape over the end just like with a phone cord end because the little clip can be broken off easily by pulling it in reverse.

Scan Gauge models also may provide gas mileage, engine loading parameters, temperatures and other things if you are interested in that type of information.    Some club organizers for the V/N model line I believe have even put presentations together at the V/N club gatherings to help get you started.    If you don't happen to attend those, I believe the presentation material is located in one of the groups "files" section but it's been a long time since I checked.
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Leo Lichodziejewski
 

I installed ScanGuage for diesels. I bought it for the distance to empty function which the trip computer is lacking. To use DTE you must verify the fuel amount every fill up and I have little faith in it. It's great though for decoding all the DEF errors. Mostly the errors go away with a check engine light reset. It's easy to install, I double sided taped it to the dash, the single wire goes to the ODB plug and is easily routed and hidden. It's interesting to see all of the engine parameters but I don't use them for much.

Leo
2011 24K


bike_for_life2003
 

Doesn't display transmission temp on I5 Sprinters :-(

-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


bike_for_life2003
 

Congrats, Don... One of your shortest posts ever... ;-)
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Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


bike_for_life2003
 

ScanGauge for diesels is designed for big rigs.  The ScanGauge II for autos works fine for later model Sprinters.

-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


old_b4_my_time
 

To get a comprehensive overview while looking for solutions from all perspectives, you can find a lot of information also on Sprinter-Source.com/forum which I use as a good go-to for chassis related questions.  They tend to speak to a more technical community of followers.    I don't believe there are as many members here who focus on the engine part of the Sprinter.  This community would however address scan gauge needs from more of a "leisure drivers" perspective.    Anyway if you want more detail, I also found this for you.  This is direct from the horse's mouth.   One of the engineers sometimes posts on the irv2.com RV forums and here was what he recently had to say about the Scan Gauge ...

Hi gchapell,

I'm James DeLong, and I do a lot of the XGauge work (basically vehicle specific gauge readouts) for the ScanGauge. I've done a little work on the Sprinter 3500 recently and was able to monitor quite a few additional gauges.

Here's the list I have:
  • Rail Pressure (PSI)
  • Boost Pressure (PSI)
  • Exhaust Back Pressure (PSI)
  • Diesel Particulate Filter Delta Pressure (PSI)
  • Boost Air Temperature (Degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Upstream of Turbocharger (Degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Exhaust Temperature Upstream of Diesel Oxidation Catalytic Converter (Degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Exhaust Temperature Upstream of Diesel Particulate Filter (Degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Fuel Temperature (Degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Engine Oil Temperature (Degrees Fahrenheit)
  • Fuel Tank Level (Gallons)
  • EGR Valve (%)
  • EGR Rate (%)
  • Transmission Torque Input (Nm)
  • Ratio of Current / Maximum Torque (%)
  • Engine Torque (Nm)
  • Diesel Particulate Filter Load (%)
  • Distance since last successful DPF Regen
  • Regen Status (On/Off)
  • Transmission Input Speed (RPM)
  • Transmission Output Speed (RPM)
  • Actual Gear (#)
  • Transmission Oil Temperature (Degrees Fahrenheit)
That's on top of all of the standard gauges such as coolant temperature, MPG, RPM, Battery Voltage, etc. I have a little data logging tool I could send you that could be used to figure out if all of the above would be available. Feel free to contact me directly at XGauge@... or through direct message on here.

Source: https://www.irv2.com/forums/f280/scan-gauge-2-for-sprinter-374228.html#post3987178

Good luck!
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Sherman Johnson
 

Thank you Don, that is very helpful!

Years ago, when I bought our ScanGauge II, what it would monitor was very limited.  In order to get trans fluid temp I had to find the secret proprietary MB codes on Sprinter-Source.

It's good to see that all of that additional data is now available.

Sherman  2009 VJ -- Western Maryland


Bob McClure
 

Would you still recommend scan II for a 2006 View with I 5 mb diesel?  What important data does it display with the  5 cyl inline diesel?  Thanks for your reply and guidance

Bob McClure 
2006 View 23 J
Redmond WA


On Sep 28, 2020, at 6:33 PM, bike_for_life2003 <guzowskip@...> wrote:

ScanGauge for diesels is designed for big rigs.  The ScanGauge II for autos works fine for later model Sprinters.

-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


bike_for_life2003
 

Don,

Can you provide the X-Gauge info to get transmission temp from a 05 Sprinter?
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


bike_for_life2003
 

Bob,

We've owned a Scan Gauge II for years on two RVs... I have yet to find a way to monitor transmission temp with it on an I5 Sprinter.   If anyone listening here has done so, please speak up.
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


Bob Knight
 

As far as I know, the transmission temperature is not available via X-Gauge. I purchased a kit to get the temperature from http://www.tuxgraphics.org/, but their shop is now closed. I never installed the kit, though, other projects and my day job intervened.

Thanks,
Bob
17NJ
Santa Fe, NM

On 9/29/20 5:06 AM, bike_for_life2003 wrote:
Don,
Can you provide the X-Gauge info to get transmission temp from a 05 Sprinter?
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL
--
17NJ
Santa Fe, NM


David Lowell
 

Does the ultra compact version provide the same functionality as the original ?


old_b4_my_time
 

RE: Transmission temperatures:   (Speed readers please read no further if you are not interested in transmission temperature - FAIR WARNING)

I once posted a query on Sprinter-Source to the T1N group (aka I5 engine model group) "what are you doing to do with transmission temperature once you find it" and I got zero responses.   I know some here don't like me guessing (LOL) but my guess is the number one reason people want temperature reading off the transmission from an I5 is because "they can't have it".   I've also asked what people who are using home made kits providing a reading obtained from the Mercedes inside transmission sensor are doing with that temperature reading and I've also gotten another zero.  

Back in late 1980's I came up with an idea I shared with some social circles regarding using a bulb temperature sensor physically wrapped with wire around the output oil cooling line of the GM turbo hydramatic transmission to provide an instantaneous "load reading" to determine when the old 3 speed automatics were being stressed too hard dragging our old coaches up the mountainside.  Some were excited to discover such an inexpensive solution to monitor the stress of their transmissions.  Of course that's not like today when we have tools like facebook and Groups IO to where we can properly ignore or ridicule such ideas if the right one in the group didn't think of it.   Many times though this social faux pas can be averted when a good standing member of the group presents the same idea with a slightly different spin (like a different brand or style read-out) and at that point the idea becomes adoptable by the masses.   So at least in the latter case some who have expressed interest in the "approved invention" can capitalize on it and this approach will solve the need for transmission temperature feedback (not to mention presenting an interesting study in today's social trends.)

In fact it was back in 2015 that I first suggested here installing an external electronic temp gauge on the oil output line to measure temperature.  At that time what most seemed to be focused on what an "engineer" had designed - an electronic circuit that could be bread-boarded and thus started selling kits that would allow T1N owners to obtain the "official Mercedes temperature" from inside the transmission.  (Note that many temperatures actually exist throughout the transmission, some changing rapidly with load and others changing slowly over time.  For example the extremely hot oil pouring out the oil cooling line into the lower radiator is the rapidly changing output oil from the heaviest work elements, while the temperature from that same oil passing through the radiator and perhaps even through an accessory oil cooler on the return line will be much, much cooler.   The pool of oil in the pan would then read more of an average temperature between the two, and with that due to it's bulk, the variance in that oil pan temp would be less over time than the oil output line which more closely mirrors the transmission stress "at the moment".    This variance would be logical to most and just like our own human bodies where different readings  can be produced according to where the reading is taken, the point of sampling will make a notable difference.   I discovered early-on the vast swings in temp that could be seen on the oil output line where they near instantaneously were based on load.   I also noted that 40 years after this discovery, that cheap digital equipment is now available to sample temperature here and to read out to a driver who might thus pro-actively take action to keep the transmission cooler based on a rapidly changing temp reading.

Still as been pointed out by many with lots of road miles behind them, without mountains or vehicles in tow, the transmission runs pretty well on auto-pilot and there's no real need to produce temperature readings other than the novelty and conquering the "wanting things we can't have" issue that seems so ingrained into our culture.  If you are a serious mountain traveler, however, I did post some oil line temperature readings on another thread that I was relatively satisfied with during a very strenuous towing trip through the mountains a couple of years ago.    Actually just now I went searching for any commercial offering that followed my idea of tapping temps off the oil output line and while I didn't find one using an exact duplicate, I did find this company who sells a $99 kit with a screw in probe in the kit that is inserted in place of a plug on the side of the transmission connecting to the oil pressure rail that I imagine would work fairly well. (And this suggestion is not based on knowing if such an access point is even available on our transmissions) .   They do offer another option of installing a probe into the oil pan but again, I find this of little value since oil pan temp is an average load temp and serves as info presented "well after the fact" of an interim of transmission stress.  Still this is not oil line output temp.

While reading up on Bowler's blinking LED warning approach to the temp variances sensed on the oil pressure rail, it was amazing to see that they list near some of the same temp readings as warning signs that I discovered only their readings appear to be 5-10 degrees less that what I noted as a warning when read off the transmission oil output line.   I would estimate this might be due to the metal shell of the transmission "heat sinking" down that temp read off the oil pressure rail, which they note as in general about 5-10 degrees less that what I discovered.   For example they list 220F as the point of first concern where off the oil output line I found 235F seemed the point that the transmission was pulling a toad up a severe mountain and this was a level quite often reached during "normal" (if there is such a thing) steep mountain climbs with the toad behind.   And where I found the thermal run-away most often beyond that was when our NAG1 (in the T1N model line) would refuse to seek 1st gear, seeming to always focus on 2nd on the steepest of inclines.   Here I was able to make the most difference in taking manual action to avert that thermal run-away.    In certain situations, the transmission would seek it's "happy place" in 2nd gear and the temp would be stable around 235F.   Then during even a slight increase as the top of the pass was reached (and where highway construction seems sometimes to quit on the last lap as far a grade minimization), at that last mile so-to-speak, I often found that the thermal run-away in 2nd gear would occur, where it would climb over a period of 2-3 minutes to 240F, 250F and whoops, one had better down-shift to 1st at this point or there would be significant damage because at this point the transmission would seem to be totally oblivious to what was happening and while an "automatic" 1st gear down-shift seemed out of reach for it to resolve the overheating situation that I was able to remedy with manual shift to 1st, where at that point during the climb the temp soon sank back to the 235F degree "stressed but not burning up" level it seem to enjoy maintaining at the pass peak.  YMMV

Here is the $99 kit if one feels more comfortable with only solutions that come in a shiny box:
https://shop.bowlertransmissions.com/products/transmission-guardian

Here is what that racing accessory company has to say about the situation of transmission heat and performance:
https://www.bowlertransmissions.com/automatic-transmissions-heat/

--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Cal
 

If you have an older T1N (5-cylinder) and want transmission temperature data then you're in luck!  Sprinter-Source forum member Nautamaran and I reversed engineered Mercedes proprietary OBD codes.  He's selling something similar to ScanGuage, but way more powerful.  

You can reach him at nautamaran@...
Calbiker

 


On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 7:53 PM Sherman Johnson <shermanajohnson@...> wrote:
Thank you Don, that is very helpful!

Years ago, when I bought our ScanGauge II, what it would monitor was
very limited.  In order to get trans fluid temp I had to find the secret
proprietary MB codes on Sprinter-Source.

It's good to see that all of that additional data is now available.

Sherman  2009 VJ -- Western Maryland







younglr98
 

When my OEM tyranny bit the dust at 137,000, with advice from multiple members here, I installed an aux filter and temp sender on the TC output to the radiator. Also a stacked plate cooler with thermo switch And a manual run switch for the 650cfm fans. Parts are all Derale. Also a PML oversize pan. I did not add a sensor to the pan as the TC output is, to me, the “lynch pin” data point.
After 35k mi, the TC temp runs very consistently 20°F less than coolant temp as read from scan gauge 2. Don’t tow, lots of mtns and headwinds >25mph.
FWIW. Photo album in the Mods forum. Roger 07VJ E WA