Topics

Sprinter T1N Jacking and Hoist Lift Points


Glenn Franco
 

See Attached Jacking and Hoisting Lift points per my Factory Dodge Sprinter Manual.
I just had new tires installed yesterday at Discount Tire in Brighton Michigan and it was a Nightmare trying to get the manager and installers to lift this vehicle (05 DRW 3500 Navion Class C) in the correct places. Half of what the manager said made no sense and the other half was completely wrong. Their jacks wouldn't go high enough and they were about to wash their hands of it but finally they got out the 10 ton jacks and proceeded correctly.
Unfortunately I have seen on this forum and on google that many are jacking and lifting these incorrectly causing unnecessary damage.
Attached is the correct lift points.


GatorJeff
 

Thx. Is an amazingly common problem. Many of us have had arguments w/the techs & managers, who insist they're right & we (and Sprinter?) are wrong.
--
Jeff S, '17 Winnebago View J, Gainesville FL


Denis Druker
 

I am an engineer and worked for a major Transmission, Axle and suspension supplier to the auto and off highway industries.  I worked on independent suspension axles for MB but not a beam axle for them.  I did work on many other beam type axles for other customers however I'm familiar with this discussion.

As others have mentioned here do what's instructed in the owner's manual.

Usually if beam axles are used to lift a vehicle and two lift points are used and are symmetrical there should not be a problem.  This has method has been used in auto repair for decades.  Especially with light trucks and cars that are not carrying a load.   BUT this is not the design basis for a solid beam axle in terms of external vehicle loads.  The loads are also much greater in a class 3 vehicle as a View which are always carrying a load.  

What goes wrong:  

--- lifting from one point (not two) on the outboard wheel end: The axle tube can crack or bend. OR the insertion point of the axle tube in the ductile iron differential housing can create a bending moment that cracks the housing.  OR you can bend the free-floating axle that drives the wheel. 

There are other situations of jacking on a beam axle that can also cause failures but I won't get into them here such as overloading one leaf spring or causing frame damage especially at attachment points of springs or sway bars. 

What MB and others have experienced is that axles are damaged and then claimed under warranty at the dealer.  No surprise.  It's almost impossible to decline the claim as you can't tell if the vehicle was jacked using the axle.  



Denis 
08 View H
Salem, WI


From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> on behalf of Glenn Franco <brakey6666@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2020 9:12 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io>
Subject: [view-naviontech] Sprinter T1N Jacking and Hoist Lift Points
 
See Attached Jacking and Hoisting Lift points per my Factory Dodge Sprinter Manual.
I just had new tires installed yesterday at Discount Tire in Brighton Michigan and it was a Nightmare trying to get the manager and installers to lift this vehicle (05 DRW 3500 Navion Class C) in the correct places. Half of what the manager said made no sense and the other half was completely wrong. Their jacks wouldn't go high enough and they were about to wash their hands of it but finally they got out the 10 ton jacks and proceeded correctly.
Unfortunately I have seen on this forum and on google that many are jacking and lifting these incorrectly causing unnecessary damage.
Attached is the correct lift points.


Scott Mysafeguardelectric
 

Glenn,
Thx for the info.  I don't see an attachment. 
Question:  How do you know if the RV was raised correctly?  Is there visible damage?  I've had several companies lift my RV over the years.

Scott Ellis,  Michigan 
Navion 06H



Sent from Samsung tablet.


-------- Original message --------
From: Glenn Franco <brakey6666@...>
Date: 8/19/20 10:14 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: [view-naviontech] Sprinter T1N Jacking and Hoist Lift Points

See Attached Jacking and Hoisting Lift points per my Factory Dodge Sprinter Manual.
I just had new tires installed yesterday at Discount Tire in Brighton Michigan and it was a Nightmare trying to get the manager and installers to lift this vehicle (05 DRW 3500 Navion Class C) in the correct places. Half of what the manager said made no sense and the other half was completely wrong. Their jacks wouldn't go high enough and they were about to wash their hands of it but finally they got out the 10 ton jacks and proceeded correctly.
Unfortunately I have seen on this forum and on google that many are jacking and lifting these incorrectly causing unnecessary damage.
Attached is the correct lift points.


Glenn Franco
 

Scott
I must not have attached the description but here it is.
Hard to say where the damage has occurred, but that would depend on a full chassis inspection. Likely it would show up as bent parts and wheel alignment problems. The tire stores tend to lift by the front lower control arms or the front crossmember all of which can be bent with improper jack or lift placement. In the rear the rear axle tubes can, when lifted impart a force on the cast iron center carrier and cause misalignment and in some cases fracture the case.


On Sat, Aug 22, 2020 at 10:05 PM Scott Mysafeguardelectric <ls8@...> wrote:
Glenn,
Thx for the info.  I don't see an attachment. 
Question:  How do you know if the RV was raised correctly?  Is there visible damage?  I've had several companies lift my RV over the years.

Scott Ellis,  Michigan 
Navion 06H



Sent from Samsung tablet.


-------- Original message --------
From: Glenn Franco <brakey6666@...>
Date: 8/19/20 10:14 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [view-naviontech] Sprinter T1N Jacking and Hoist Lift Points

See Attached Jacking and Hoisting Lift points per my Factory Dodge Sprinter Manual.
I just had new tires installed yesterday at Discount Tire in Brighton Michigan and it was a Nightmare trying to get the manager and installers to lift this vehicle (05 DRW 3500 Navion Class C) in the correct places. Half of what the manager said made no sense and the other half was completely wrong. Their jacks wouldn't go high enough and they were about to wash their hands of it but finally they got out the 10 ton jacks and proceeded correctly.
Unfortunately I have seen on this forum and on google that many are jacking and lifting these incorrectly causing unnecessary damage.
Attached is the correct lift points.


Scott Mysafeguardelectric
 

Thx Glenn



Sent from Samsung tablet.


-------- Original message --------
From: Glenn Franco <brakey6666@...>
Date: 8/23/20 8:29 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: Re: [view-naviontech] Sprinter T1N Jacking and Hoist Lift Points

Scott
I must not have attached the description but here it is.
Hard to say where the damage has occurred, but that would depend on a full chassis inspection. Likely it would show up as bent parts and wheel alignment problems. The tire stores tend to lift by the front lower control arms or the front crossmember all of which can be bent with improper jack or lift placement. In the rear the rear axle tubes can, when lifted impart a force on the cast iron center carrier and cause misalignment and in some cases fracture the case.

On Sat, Aug 22, 2020 at 10:05 PM Scott Mysafeguardelectric <ls8@...> wrote:
Glenn,
Thx for the info.  I don't see an attachment. 
Question:  How do you know if the RV was raised correctly?  Is there visible damage?  I've had several companies lift my RV over the years.

Scott Ellis,  Michigan 
Navion 06H



Sent from Samsung tablet.


-------- Original message --------
From: Glenn Franco <brakey6666@...>
Date: 8/19/20 10:14 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [view-naviontech] Sprinter T1N Jacking and Hoist Lift Points

See Attached Jacking and Hoisting Lift points per my Factory Dodge Sprinter Manual.
I just had new tires installed yesterday at Discount Tire in Brighton Michigan and it was a Nightmare trying to get the manager and installers to lift this vehicle (05 DRW 3500 Navion Class C) in the correct places. Half of what the manager said made no sense and the other half was completely wrong. Their jacks wouldn't go high enough and they were about to wash their hands of it but finally they got out the 10 ton jacks and proceeded correctly.
Unfortunately I have seen on this forum and on google that many are jacking and lifting these incorrectly causing unnecessary damage.
Attached is the correct lift points.