Topics

Tire Pressure question


John8392@...
 

Here is a question I have regarding tire pressure.  I do not understand why Sprinter recommends tire pressure of 61 psi and on the Continental tire itself recommend 80 psi?  Seems like a huge difference!  What do you do??   If you can, a simple explanation please.
Thanks
John '20 ND


Paul Rouis
 

80 is the maximum the tire can take not the recommended pressure.

61 cold is calibrated to the GAWR.

Best is to weigh the rig to confirm but if you run “fully loaded” 2-4 psi more is fine and won’t impact the ride too severely.

80 however will feel like a buckboard on anything less than super smooth paving.

 

Paul

07VJNY

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of John8392 via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 10:28 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: [view-naviontech] Tire Pressure question

 

Here is a question I have regarding tire pressure.  I do not understand why Sprinter recommends tire pressure of 61 psi and on the Continental tire itself recommend 80 psi?  Seems like a huge difference!  What do you do??   If you can, a simple explanation please.

Thanks

John '20 ND

 


Bernie Zephro
 

When a vehicle manufacturer recommends a tire pressure, a lot of factors enter into that. The weight of the vehicle, the handling characteristic, comfort, tire wear, the safety. That is why Sprinter chose 61psi with this gvw package. Their engineers must have figured this out.
Bernie 2021 VD on order

On Friday, October 16, 2020, 10:34:48 AM EDT, Paul Rouis <prouis@...> wrote:


80 is the maximum the tire can take not the recommended pressure.

61 cold is calibrated to the GAWR.

Best is to weigh the rig to confirm but if you run “fully loaded” 2-4 psi more is fine and won’t impact the ride too severely.

80 however will feel like a buckboard on anything less than super smooth paving.

 

Paul

07VJNY

From: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io <discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io> On Behalf Of John8392 via groups.io
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 10:28 AM
To: discussion@view-naviontech.groups.io
Subject: [view-naviontech] Tire Pressure question

 

Here is a question I have regarding tire pressure.  I do not understand why Sprinter recommends tire pressure of 61 psi and on the Continental tire itself recommend 80 psi?  Seems like a huge difference!  What do you do??   If you can, a simple explanation please.

Thanks

John '20 ND

 


Gordon
 

A past discussion regarding tire pressure included a caveat relating to those of us in the northern climates and needing to store or Views for 5+ months......when the unit is going to be stored for extended periods of time, it is wise practice to place thin pieces of wood between the tires and concrete/ground and to increase tire pressure to the psi stated on the tire sidewall.

Gordy View H
Wisconsin


John8392@...
 

Good to know  Thanks everyone!


On Friday, October 16, 2020, 03:57:33 PM EDT, Gordon <hubbardgordon@...> wrote:


A past discussion regarding tire pressure included a caveat  relating to those of us in the northern climates and needing to store or Views for 5+ months......when the unit is going to be stored for extended periods of time, it is wise practice to place thin pieces of wood between the tires and concrete/ground and to increase tire pressure to the psi stated on the tire sidewall.

Gordy View H
Wisconsin





lou Thomson
 

Tire pressures are based on MFR and weight, if you have never corner weighed your vehicle fully loaded you have no idea of how much weight you have on each corner, so you can follow the tire MFR guidelines..so many of these are overloaded both physical weight and towing..keep that in mind...


old_b4_my_time
 

I've found 70 psi works best for me (always loaded to the max) especially over marginal roads.  Plus many more tire shops that do Sprinter fleet tire contracts tell me it's a better idea to go with 70 psi. Of course growing up on a farm with a lot of overloaded vehicles one learns to keep the pressure on the high end or suffer a lot of blow-outs.   I don't like the waltz and dance that 60 psi shows and several tire shops have said that's why my sidewalls crack prematurely because I was running at the recommended pressure in the low 60's.   One thing's for sure, if you ask 10 people you'll get 10 different answers and they will all be experts, it turns out.    I just like the more sturdy drive I get at 70 psi and if I feel a cobblestone a little rougher than I do when running 60psi, then I'll deal with that over increased tread temps and sidewall wear while running on lower inflated tires.   So what I would do is set the pressure for your desired ride, working in the 60-70psi range until you get to the point where your drive feels best.  
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Bob
 

I couldn’t agree more Don. The 60 psi range seems to be for the manufacturer weight of the vehicle / Motorhome.  Not the loaded weight.  My tire temperatures run around 22 degrees cooler at 70 psi with sunshine and outdoor temps of 80 degrees.

I would rather feel the concrete expansion joints than have a soft squishy ride that raises tire temperatures.

My stepdad was a engineer at Uniroyal tire.  I spent some time in the MI plant back in the day.  They did a lot of tire testing and several tests were for temperature breakdown.  They would contact customers and trade new tires for older tires so they could test blowout temperatures. The higher the temperature and the older the tire, the more chance for blowout.

I’ll take safety over ride softness and use the weight to pressure charts for setting my tire pressure.

Bob.

On Oct 22, 2020, at 09:45, old_b4_my_time <donphillipe@...> wrote:

I've found 70 psi works best for me (always loaded to the max) especially over marginal roads.  Plus many more tire shops that do Sprinter fleet tire contracts tell me it's a better idea to go with 70 psi. Of course growing up on a farm with a lot of overloaded vehicles one learns to keep the pressure on the high end or suffer a lot of blow-outs.   I don't like the waltz and dance that 60 psi shows and several tire shops have said that's why my sidewalls crack prematurely because I was running at the recommended pressure in the low 60's.   One thing's for sure, if you ask 10 people you'll get 10 different answers and they will all be experts, it turns out.    I just like the more sturdy drive I get at 70 psi and if I feel a cobblestone a little rougher than I do when running 60psi, then I'll deal with that over increased tread temps and sidewall wear while running on lower inflated tires.   So what I would do is set the pressure for your desired ride, working in the 60-70psi range until you get to the point where your drive feels best.  
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


Bernie Zephro
 

So let me understand this. The engineers who came up with 61psi for these vehicles don't know what they are talking about and the end users do. Based on the tires being used and a gvw of 11030 lbs, Mecedes actually came up with about 55psi. This was changed by a DOT recommendation to add 10% psi to the gvw number. That is why it is 61 psi. If you are running overloaded I guess that would run slightly higher. Best to watch your tire wear.

On Thursday, October 22, 2020, 11:25:21 AM EDT, Bob via groups.io <nw8r@...> wrote:


I couldn’t agree more Don. The 60 psi range seems to be for the manufacturer weight of the vehicle / Motorhome.  Not the loaded weight.  My tire temperatures run around 22 degrees cooler at 70 psi with sunshine and outdoor temps of 80 degrees.

I would rather feel the concrete expansion joints than have a soft squishy ride that raises tire temperatures.

My stepdad was a engineer at Uniroyal tire.  I spent some time in the MI plant back in the day.  They did a lot of tire testing and several tests were for temperature breakdown.  They would contact customers and trade new tires for older tires so they could test blowout temperatures. The higher the temperature and the older the tire, the more chance for blowout.

I’ll take safety over ride softness and use the weight to pressure charts for setting my tire pressure.

Bob.

On Oct 22, 2020, at 09:45, old_b4_my_time <donphillipe@...> wrote:

I've found 70 psi works best for me (always loaded to the max) especially over marginal roads.  Plus many more tire shops that do Sprinter fleet tire contracts tell me it's a better idea to go with 70 psi. Of course growing up on a farm with a lot of overloaded vehicles one learns to keep the pressure on the high end or suffer a lot of blow-outs.   I don't like the waltz and dance that 60 psi shows and several tire shops have said that's why my sidewalls crack prematurely because I was running at the recommended pressure in the low 60's.   One thing's for sure, if you ask 10 people you'll get 10 different answers and they will all be experts, it turns out.    I just like the more sturdy drive I get at 70 psi and if I feel a cobblestone a little rougher than I do when running 60psi, then I'll deal with that over increased tread temps and sidewall wear while running on lower inflated tires.   So what I would do is set the pressure for your desired ride, working in the 60-70psi range until you get to the point where your drive feels best.  
--
Don - 2006 Navion J


James Selm
 

Yea! 80 psi on side wall is a max  level psi, has almost nothing to do with the ideal psi determined by load. Jim 07VH FLOH

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 10:28 AM John8392 via groups.io <John8392=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here is a question I have regarding tire pressure.  I do not understand why Sprinter recommends tire pressure of 61 psi and on the Continental tire itself recommend 80 psi?  Seems like a huge difference!  What do you do??   If you can, a simple explanation please.
Thanks
John '20 ND


Dale Lucas
 

All,
Be aware that tire shops (like  Discount Tire) will put in 80 psi if your not watching.
To their defense, they think of our motorhomes as trucks, like say a Fed X delivery truck that can vary greatly in payload weight, justifying the maximum pressure.
What I've done when I didn't have access to compressed air either at home or on a trip was ask them to install more pressure than I actually would want, then air the tires down to the appropriate pressure the next morning.
Even using a home compressor can throw off the finally pressure later as the compressing process heats up the air going into your tires giving a false reading later (next morning) when they have cooled.
So, the slightly over pressure (5 psi) and then airing down later approach works well at home too.
Dale
12J
Las Cruces, NM


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 9:35 PM, James Selm
<james.selm@...> wrote:
Yea! 80 psi on side wall is a max  level psi, has almost nothing to do with the ideal psi determined by load. Jim 07VH FLOH

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 10:28 AM John8392 via groups.io <John8392=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here is a question I have regarding tire pressure.  I do not understand why Sprinter recommends tire pressure of 61 psi and on the Continental tire itself recommend 80 psi?  Seems like a huge difference!  What do you do??   If you can, a simple explanation please.
Thanks
John '20 ND


JPS
 

FWIW, most Walmart tire centers + tire stores will throw you a hose if you need tire air while on the road. Carry a good tire gauge. Jim 07VH LOH


On Mon, Oct 26, 2020 at 9:20 AM Dale Lucas via groups.io <da_lucas=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
All,
Be aware that tire shops (like  Discount Tire) will put in 80 psi if your not watching.
To their defense, they think of our motorhomes as trucks, like say a Fed X delivery truck that can vary greatly in payload weight, justifying the maximum pressure.
What I've done when I didn't have access to compressed air either at home or on a trip was ask them to install more pressure than I actually would want, then air the tires down to the appropriate pressure the next morning.
Even using a home compressor can throw off the finally pressure later as the compressing process heats up the air going into your tires giving a false reading later (next morning) when they have cooled.
So, the slightly over pressure (5 psi) and then airing down later approach works well at home too.
Dale
12J
Las Cruces, NM


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 9:35 PM, James Selm
Yea! 80 psi on side wall is a max  level psi, has almost nothing to do with the ideal psi determined by load. Jim 07VH FLOH

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 10:28 AM John8392 via groups.io <John8392=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here is a question I have regarding tire pressure.  I do not understand why Sprinter recommends tire pressure of 61 psi and on the Continental tire itself recommend 80 psi?  Seems like a huge difference!  What do you do??   If you can, a simple explanation please.
Thanks
John '20 ND


Talowry@...
 

Not long ago a topic on this forum had to do with what is “mission critical” to have while RV’ing.  IMO, a good quality compressor to use for keeping tires properly inflated is as “mission critical” as anything.  This is especially true for those of us that travel the backroads and dry camp or boondock.  
As for tire pressure, it is very much an individual thing as the comments on the topic suggest.  I am running the 61 PSI recommended and have been reasonably happy with the ride.  That may be because the wife and I drive in two hour shifts and seldom more than six hours in a day.  We’ve put ~15k miles on a 2013 we bought in late 2018 with 16.7k miles on it.  The Michelin Defender LTX’s were new at purchase.

Tom 13NiQV 


bike_for_life2003
 

Interesting point, Tom, regarding tire pressure being an individual thing.  There are a lot of assertions/opinions here which are based on PHOG (Prophecy, Hearsay, Opinion and Gut feel) rather than fact..  According to Michelin, the right pressures for our Defender LTX tires are only set correctly once the vehicle is weighed (as loaded for travel) so the weight borne by each tire is known.  According to Michelin, this will give us the correct pressure to insure best comfort, braking, handling, and tread life.  These are the facts from the tire manufacturer which I trust... 
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL


Dale Lucas
 

All,
I'll chime in here to clarify that the Michelin Tire pressure chart can be used for each axle instead of each wheel.
That is much easier to get weighed.
Some larger truck stops have scales that would certainly allow one axle at a time to be on the scale, so do state highway weigh stations.
Of course highway weigh stations would not want us in there when they are open.
Oregon for instance leaves the digital readout on at their weigh stations when closed, don't know about other states.
What I do is use the "worst case" weight as measured on a typical trip (fully loaded, tanks full), look those up on the chart then set pressure on the high side to accommodate for changes in load.
I would rather have a little extra pressure than a little less pressure to avoid tire failure.
Everyone should know that once you have the tire pressure where you want it, that pressure will change with time, elevation, ambient temperature, sun exposure and any driving.  
No big deal, just check it first thing in the morning before driving and direct sun exposure.
Dale
12 J
Las Cruces, NM

On Sunday, November 8, 2020, 06:42:13 AM MST, bike_for_life2003 <guzowskip@...> wrote:


Interesting point, Tom, regarding tire pressure being an individual thing.  There are a lot of assertions/opinions here which are based on PHOG (Prophecy, Hearsay, Opinion and Gut feel) rather than fact..  According to Michelin, the right pressures for our Defender LTX tires are only set correctly once the vehicle is weighed (as loaded for travel) so the weight borne by each tire is known.  According to Michelin, this will give us the correct pressure to insure best comfort, braking, handling, and tread life.  These are the facts from the tire manufacturer which I trust... 
-----------------------
Paul and Christine
06 View 23H in NW FL